Life Sciences and Agriculture

Journal of Water and Land Development

Content

Journal of Water and Land Development | 2022 | No 54

Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Analysis of groundwater quality in the alluvial aquifer of the lower Soummam Valley, North-East of Algeria, was realised through the application of multivariate statistical methods: hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) in Q and R modes, factorial correspondence analysis (FCA), and principal component analysis (PCA), to hydrochemical data from 51 groundwater samples, collected from 17 boreholes during periods of June, September 2016 and March 2017. The objectives of this approach are to characterise the water quality and to know the factors which govern its evolution by processes controlling its chemical composition. The Piper diagram shows two hydrochemical facies: calcium chloride and sodium bicarbonate. Statistical techniques HCA, PCA, and FCA reveal two groups of waters: the first (EC, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl–, SO42– and NO3–) of evaporitic origin linked to the dissolution processes of limestone rocks, leaching of saliferous soils and anthropogenic processes, namely contamination wastewater and agricultural activity, as well marine intrusion; and the second group (Na+, K+, and HCO3–) of carbonated origin influenced by the dissolution of carbonate formations and the exchange of bases. The thermodynamic study has shown that all groundwater is undersaturated with respect to evaporitic minerals. On the other hand, it is supersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals, except for water from boreholes F9, F14, and F16, which possibly comes down to the lack of dissolution and arrival of these minerals. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the utility of multivariate statistical methods in the analysis of groundwater quality.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Messaoud Ghodbane
1
ORCID: ORCID
Lahcen Benaabidate
2
ORCID: ORCID
Abderrahmane Boudoukha
3
ORCID: ORCID
Aissam Gaagai
4
ORCID: ORCID
Omar Adjissi
5
ORCID: ORCID
Warda Chaib
4
ORCID: ORCID
Hani Amir Aouissi
4
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Mohamed Boudiaf, Faculty of Technology, Laboratory of City, Environment, Society and Sustainable Development, 166 Ichebilia, 28000, M’sila, Algeria
  2. University of Sidi Mohammed Ben Abdellah, Faculty of Sciences and Techniques, Laboratory of Functional Ecology and Environment Engineering, Fez, Morocco
  3. University of Batna 2, Laboratory of Applied Research in Hydraulics, Batna, Algeria
  4. Scientific and Technical Research Center for Arid Areas (CRSTRA), Biskra, Algeria
  5. University of Mohamed Boudiaf, Faculty of Technology, M’sila, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

This article accounts for the development of a powerful artificial neural network (ANN) model, designed for the prediction of relative humidity levels, using other meteorological parameters such as the maximum temperature, minimum temperature, precipitation, wind speed, and intensity of solar radiation in the Rabat-Kenitra region (a coastal area where relative humidity is a real concern). The model was applied to a database containing a daily history of five meteorological parameters collected by nine stations covering this region from 1979 to mid-2014.
It has been demonstrated that the best performing three-layer (input, hidden, and output) ANN mathematical model for the prediction of relative humidity in this region is the multi-layer perceptron (MLP) model. This neural model using the Levenberg–Marquard algorithm, with an architecture of [5-11-1] and the transfer functions Tansig in the hidden layer and Purelin in the output layer, was able to estimate relative humidity values that were very close to those observed. This was affirmed by a low mean squared error ( MSE) and a high correlation coefficient ( R), compared to the statistical indicators relating to the other models developed as part of this study.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Kaoutar El Azhari
1
ORCID: ORCID
Badreddine Abdallaoui
2
Ali Dehbi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Abdelaziz Abdalloui
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hamid Zineddine
1

  1. Moulay Ismail University, Faculty of Sciences, Zitoune, 50000, Meknes, Morocco
  2. University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford, United Kingdom
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The article is devoted to the current scientific and practical problems of planning irrigation with phytomonitoring methods. In particular, it focuses on the methodological approach to tomato irrigation planning. The field experiment was laid by the method of systematic placement of elementary plots in four replicates. The PM-11Z phytomonitor was used to determine changes in stem diameter, juice flow, leaf temperature, and fruit growth.
On the basis of the experimental studies, parameters are defined for the start of watering with the positive, negative and zero water balance of the plant. It has been proved that when vegetative irrigation is planned with a positive plant water balance, the daily amplitude of stem contraction ( DCA) and the trend of the sap flow rate should be analysed. A fall in two consecutive morning stem diameter peaks ( MXSD) indicates a negative plant water balance, which is the starting point for watering. To assign watering with a zero water balance, it is necessary to use information from the fruit growth sensor and the juice flow rate. A decrease in their indications marks the need for the next watering.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Andrii Shatkovskyi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Olexandr Zhuravlov
1
ORCID: ORCID
Volodymyr Vasiuta
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation of NAAS, 37, Vasyl’kivs’ka str., Kyiv, 03022 Ukraine
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

This work describes the behaviour of organic pollutants along the wadi Mouillah watercourse and its main tributaries and their impacts on the Hammam Boughrara dam, located in the NW of Algeria, in the Wilaya of Tlemcen. The use of a database relating to physico-chemical, biotic and hydrological variables, covering the period from January 2006 to December 2009, contributed to the understanding of the spatiotemporal evolution of each variable. The application of a mathematical model of the diffusion by convection-dispersion with a reaction on two characteristic parameters of organic pollution, the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD 5) which records values above the norm, with peaks that can reach 614%, and total phosphorus (P tot), which the concentration is always higher with maxima reaching 53 mg∙dm –3 favouring eutrophication; this made it possible with precision to synthesise the propagation of pollutants in the liquid mass. The results obtained on the waters of Wadi Mouillah are therefore of poor quality; there is a need to set up a rigorous water quality monitoring system, with water treatment and decontamination devices to preserve the water resources. This will allow to contribute to better management of water quality in terms of combating the spread of pollution. Therefore, they can be used to support decisions in the context of sustainable development.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Lotfi Benadda
1
ORCID: ORCID
Belkheir Djelita
2
ORCID: ORCID
Abdelghani Chiboub-Fellah
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Tlemcen, Research Laboratory No. 60: Valorization of Water Resources, PO Box 230, 13000 Tlemcen, Algeria
  2. Ziane Achour University of Djelfa, Department of Hydraulic, Djelfa, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

By 2050, global crop demand is projected to rise by 60–110%. Crop yields have also been impacted by climate change in some nations, and these impacts are likely to continue. To prevent the influence of climate change on crop output, it is critical to adjust planting times in weather-related open fields to meet food security concerns. Present study was carried out at Experimental Farm of Faculty of Agriculture, Al-Azhar University, Assiut, Egypt, during two successive seasons, 2019 and 2020. It was aimed to study the effect of different sowing times (1st and 15th October, 1st and 15th November), and plant spacings (25, 20, and 15 cm) on growth, fruit yield, and oil production of caraway ( Carum carvi L.) plants. The results showed that sowing caraway plants on 15th October with plant spacing of 25 cm gave the highest dry weight (72.6 g∙plant –1), fresh weight (266.15 g∙plant –1), seed yield (37.43 g∙plant –1), and oil yield (0.659 cm3∙plant –1). The maximum umbels (50.83 number per plant) and essential oil (1.78%) were also recorded in the plants receiving same treatment. On the other hand, plants sown at 15th November with spacing of 15 cm exhibited the minimum values of recorded traits. While the highest value of plant height gave with sowing caraway plants on 15th October with plant spacing of 15 cm (135.35 cm). In conclusion, the plants sowed on October 15th with a maximum plant spacing of 25 cm had the highest values of the evaluated morphological, biochemical, and yield attributes of caraway.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Mostafa Fathi Ibrahim
1
ORCID: ORCID
Muhammad Moaaz Ali
2
ORCID: ORCID
Sobhi F. Lamlom
3
ORCID: ORCID
Hazem M. Kalaji
4 5
ORCID: ORCID
Ahmed F. Yousef
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Al-Azhar (branch Assiut), College of Agriculture, Department of Horticulture, Assiut 71524, Egypt
  2. Fujian Agricultural and Forestry University, College of Horticulture, Fuzhou, China
  3. Alexandria University, Faculty of Agriculture Saba Basha, Plant Production Department, Alexandria, Egypt
  4. Warsaw University of Life Sciences (SGGW), Institute of Biology, Department of Plant Physiology, Warsaw, Poland
  5. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Ballast water is a significant vector for the transport and introduction of aquatic organisms, microorganisms and chemical pollutants which impacts on ecosystems worldwide. In the study, ballast water from short- and long- range vessels with treatment systems was microbiologically evaluated in spring (April 20th) and summer (July 19th) and compared with waters of the main Police Seaport in the Odra River Estuary, southern Baltic Sea. All collected samples were evaluated for their physicochemical properties by standard methods. The number of individual groups of microorganisms was determined using the indirect culture method, according to the technique of inoculation of serial dilutions of samples of the examined waters. The results showed differences in the microorganisms in analysed samples. The phylogenetic analysis of bacteria recorded from the ballast water of short-range ships in spring showed the presence of six species of the genus Bordetella, while in summer four species of the genus Clostridium. In the ballast water of long-range ships, proteolytic bacteria pre-dominated in spring and halophilic bacteria in summer. In the summer period, eight species of bacteria were recorded, of which six belonged to the genus Clostridium. The ballast water treatment processes used on ships influence the composition of bacterial communities through selective recolonisation of water, which may transform bacterial functions as an important element of the marine food web. On the other hand, the presence of pathogenic bacterial species in the tested samples indicates improvement necessity of ballast water treatment systems used on vessels.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Kinga Zatoń-Sieczka
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Magdalena Błaszak
2
ORCID: ORCID
Marta Buśko
3
ORCID: ORCID
Przemysław Czerniejewski
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Westpomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Department of Commodity, Quality Assessment, Process Engineering and Human Nutrition, Kazimierza Królewicza 4 St., 71-550 Szczecin, Poland
  2. Westpomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Department of Bioengineering, Laboratory of Microbiology and Environmental Biochemistry, Słowackiego 17 St., 71-434 Szczecin, Poland
  3. Westpomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Department of Bioengineering, Laboratory of General Chemistry and Environmental Analysis, Szczecin, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Polluted water poses significant health risks when it is part of the water sources used for irrigation, leading to the contamination of soil and plants by various pollutants. This work aims, firstly, to assess the degree of pollution of Wadi El Gourzi water (Batna, Algeria), and then to verify the consequences on their use for the irrigation of market garden plants for everyday consumption (lettuce, cilantro, parsley and spinach), both in the aerial part (stems and leaves) and in the soil where they are grown. This study focuses on trace metals (Cr, Pb, Zn and Cd). Soil pollution was assessed by calculating the soil pollution index ( PI), while the uptake of these elements by plants was monitored by the transfer factor ( TF). The analyses of the Wadi El Gourzi water with the flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (FAAS) show a maximum abnormal concentration of Cr (17.37 mg∙dm –3), Pb (0.71 mg∙dm –3) and Cd (0.45 mg∙dm –3). For the analysis of the soils irrigated by these waters, the results of the PI show that the soils used for the cultivation of parsley and lettuce are polluted by several metals ( PI > 1). The concentrations of trace metals elements (TMEs) in the sampled plants show a significant accumulation of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cr by the vegetables (coriander, parsley, spinach and lettuce). These concentrations are above the permitted standards.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Farida Benfarhi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mohamed Redha Menani
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Batna 2, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Earth and Universal Sciences, Water Resources Mobilisation and Management Laboratory (MGRE), 53, Route de Constantine, Fésdis, 05078, Batna, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The aim of the study was to recognise the accumulation of organic carbon (SOC) in the soils of Polish grasslands (GL) and to consider the possibility of increasing its sequestration in these soils. The Tiurin method (mineral soils) and the mass loss method (soil of organic origin) were used. It was found that: (i) the average SOC content of mineral soils is 2.44% and of organic soils – 10.42%; (ii) according to the Polish criteria, approximately 84% of GL mineral soils are classified as classes with high and very high SOC content, and over 15% and 1% – in classes with medium and low SOC content, respectively; more than 99% of organic soils belong to two classes with the highest SOC content and less than 1% to the class with an average content; (iii) according to the European Soil Bureau, the share of GL mineral soils with a high SOC content is slightly over 4%, medium – slightly over 47%, and low and very low – around 50%; for organic soils they are 67, 29, and 4%, respectively; (iv) the reserves of organic carbon in the 0–30 cm layer on the entire surface of GL soils amount to 412.7 Tg of SOC. There is considerable scope for increasing the SOC stock in meadow-pasture soils.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Stefan Pietrzak
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jakub T. Hołaj-Krzak
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Falenty, 3 Hrabska Avenue, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The aim of the research was to study the temporal and spatial dynamics of a set of agronomic criteria for irrigation water in the process of transporting it from the Southern Buh River intake site to the lands of the Southern Buh and Kamianska irrigation systems situated in southern Ukraine. Six stationary research sites for monitoring the quality of irrigation water were established along the route of irrigation water transportation. Determination of agronomic criteria for irrigation water quality was carried out in two terms: at the beginning of the irrigation season, in May, and at the end, in September. The content of cations of sodium, magnesium, calcium, and anions of chlorine, sulphates, carbonates, and bicarbonates was determined. In the field, the pH and electrical conductivity of water, the total salt content, and the total amount of dissolved solids were determined. It is determined that waters have an average level of danger from the point of view of salinisation of soils. This fact leads to a decrease in yield of sensitive to salinity crops (corn, alfalfa and most vegetables). The high content of sodium cations along with the low content of calcium and magnesium cations indicates the danger of degradation of the physical properties of the southern chernozems and the need to use the meliorants containing calcium. There is a high probability of toxic effects on crops caused by sodium cations. At the same time, it is stated that there is no negative effect of chlorine anions on plants.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Sergiy Chornyy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Vera Isaiva
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Mykolayiv National Agrarian University, Faculty of Agricultural Technologies, Heorhiia Honhadze St, 9, Mykolaiv, 54020, Ukraine
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to assess the impact of industrial wastewater on the concentration of methanol in the considered section of the Ob River basin, present proposals for the implementation of a new treatment system and analyse the implementation results. On the basis of the results of the analysis of the known methods for reducing the concentration of methanol in water, a new technological scheme for post-treatment of effluents using biological treatment with methylotrophic Methylomonas methanica Dg bacteria was proposed. The calculation of the dilution of treated wastewater using the “NDS Ecolog” program was carried out on the basis of the detailed calculation method of Karaushev, the results of which showed a decrease in the concentration of methanol in the control section to 0.0954 mg∙dm –3 (permissible concentration is 0.1 mg∙dm –3). During the period of the flood of the Glukhaya channel, it ceases to be a separate water body and, in fact, becomes part of the flood channel of the Ob River. Certain parts of the flooded areas, due to elevation changes, communicate with the channel only during a short period of time when the water level rises, i.e. 3–5 weeks during the flood period, and in fact remain isolated reservoirs for the rest of the time, potentially acting as zones of accumulation and concentration of pollutants.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Andrey Ivanov
1
ORCID: ORCID
Alexey Strizhenok
1
ORCID: ORCID
Gabriel Borowski
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Saint-Petersburg Mining University, Faculty of Mining Engineering, 21st Line of Vasilyevsky island, 2, 199106, Saint-Petersburg, Russia
  2. Lublin University of Technology, Faculty of Environmental Engineering, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

One of the rational ways of energy saving is to use the heat of wastewater from energy companies for open ground heating and cultivation crops. The most significant sources of heat are thermal and nuclear power plants that produce low-thermal waters of 28–35°C.
Heating of the ground with the use of circulating warm water allows to increase temperature at all points of the soil profile. The maximum thermal effect from heating ground is observed at the depth of pipe heaters (7.3– 11.1°C).
Ground heating allows to extend the growing season for crops by 3–4 weeks, which can expedite harvesting and thus maximise the harvest. In natural moisture conditions, ground heating does not lead to significant reduction of moisture reserves in the active layer throughout the growing period. There is a redistribution of moisture in a soil profile. It decreases in the zone of pipe heaters and redistributes toward the top. The formation of the nutrient regime changes, the content of mobile phosphorus and potassium, and nitrate nitrogen increases, whereas the content of ammonia nitrogen is reduced. Ground heating is a new special heat reclamation technique. It allows not only to control temperature of the agricultural crop environment, but also to dissipate heat in the ground, and promote the utilisation of waste heat and the stabilisation of the environment.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Vasil Turcheniuk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Anatoliy Rokochinskiy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Lyudmyla Kuzmych
2
ORCID: ORCID
Pavlo Volk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Roman Koptyuk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ivan Romanyuk
1
ORCID: ORCID
Galyna Voropay
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Department of Water Engineering and Technologies, Rivne, Ukraine
  2. Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation NAAS, Department of Land Reclamation, 03022, 37 Vasylkivska Str., Kyiv, Ukraine
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The configuration of the smart irrigation system was designed on the basis of data specific to the parameters concerning characteristics of the plant and the pedological properties of the local soil (permeability, pH, humidity, porosity, etc.), including the meteorological factors. In the Chlef area, the water availability is dependent on meteorological data. The objective of this work is to estimate irrigation water needs in crop gardening (potato) based on a smart irrigation system (SIS). Thus, to ensure an equilibrated growth of crops, we have developed a system with parameters, such as soil moisture and soil temperature, which are the input variables of this smart irrigation system. This system was applied for the irrigation of potatoes (‘Bartina’ variety), planted in the agricultural experimental station of Lard El Beida at Chlef. The results obtained in terms of production yield led to a conclusion that the smart irrigation system allows achieving production of 124.83% with lower water consumption (–19.31%), compared to that of a drip irrigation system. Moreover, the granulometric analysis of the potato tuber size showed that 80.83% of the production is within the size range between 30 mm and 55 mm. By comparison, we observed that 77.4% of products obtained from drip irrigation follow a uniform distribution. We conclude that this smart irrigation system is very economical in terms of water use for gardening crops. Given these encouraging results, it would be wiser to generalize its application and implement it to guarantee food self-sufficiency in the water-deficient regions.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Mohammed Amoura
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mustapha Douani
1
ORCID: ORCID
Toufik Tahri
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Hassiba Benbouali University of Chlef, Faculty of Technology, Laboratory of Vegetal Chemistry-Water-Energy, Algeria
  2. Hassiba Benbouali University of Chlef, Faculty of Technology, Laboratory of Electrical Engineering and Renewable Energy LGEER, Route nationale No. 19, 2000, Chlef, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The global warming and subsequent climate change has seriously threatened the glaciers of the Hindukush Karakoram Himalaya (HKH) region. These glaciers provide water to more than 60% people of the 11 countries, including Pakistan. The capital city of Pakistan has witnessed unprecedented urbanisation, population increase, development of new townships and associated economic activities. These challenges, together with climate change, have created severe pressure on the water resources of the city. In this mixed mode research, including questionnaire survey of 20 questions was distributed among the residents of the city online through Google Form. The questions were related to the expected impact of climate change on the availability of water, measures for conservation of water etc. About 205 residents from various parts of the city with different demographic backgrounds responded. This was followed by Focus Group Discussions (FDGs) of the experts and the major challenges to the urban water security of Islamabad with special reference to climate change have been assessed. The research has revealed that the water resources of the city are highly unsustainable. The residents have high concerns about the availability and quality of water. The results have shown that there is a number of governance issues in water distribution systems of the city. There are no organized water conservation strategies employed by City Government. The lack of institutional and policy framework has further complicated the situation. Residents seem willing for metering of water for its conservation. Recommendations have been made to municipal authorities for rational water resource management of the city.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Attaullah Shah
1
Rehmat Karim
2
Karamat Ali
3

  1. Karakorum International University, Department of Civil Engineering Technology, University Road, Gilgit, 15100, Baltistan, Pakistan
  2. Karakorum International University, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Gilgit, Baltistan, Pakistan
  3. Karakorum International University, Department of Environmental Sciences, Gilgit, Baltistan, Pakistan
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Dam construction is one of the measures that is inevitable in many cases and must be done to supply drinking water, agricultural uses and electricity generation. There are many challenges to a successful dam project, and the managers of each project must consider the appropriate solutions for them. One of the studies that is done in dam design is sedimentation in dam reservoirs. The experimental area-reduction method is a very common technique that obtains the sediment distribution in depth and longitudinal profile. This technique shows that sediment accumulation is not limited to the bottom reservoirs. Sediment accumulation in a reservoir is usually distributed below the top of the protection reservoir or normal water level. In this study, the distribution of sediment in the reservoir of Karun Dam after a period of 65 years has been done using the experimental area-reduction method. Elevation–volume and elevation–area curves of the dam reservoir are obtained after the useful life of the dam and sediment deposition. The results showed that after 65 years, 106.47·10 6 m 3 of sediment is deposited in the reservoir of the dam and the useful volume of the reservoir is significantly reduced. Also, up to a height of 36.4 m, the dam reservoir is filled with sediment. Therefore, no valve should be placed up to this height.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Rakhmat Yusuf
1
ORCID: ORCID
Aan Komariah
1
ORCID: ORCID
Dedy Achmad Kurniady
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mardiani Mardiani
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jumintono Jumintono
2
ORCID: ORCID
Khaldoon T. Falih
3
ORCID: ORCID
Oleg V. Kabanov
4
ORCID: ORCID
Surendar Aravindhan
5
ORCID: ORCID
Mustafa Mohammed Kadhim
6
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia, Department of Civil Engineering, Jl. Dr. Setiabudi No. 229, Isola, Kec. Sukasari, Bandung, Jawa Barat 40154, Indonesia
  2. Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia, Faculty of Technical and Vocational Education, Batu Pahat, Johor, Malaysia
  3. Al-Ayen University, Scientific Research Center, New Era and Development in Civil Engineering Research Group, Dhi-Qar, Iraq
  4. National Research Ogarev Mordovia State University, Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Republic of Mordovia, Saransk, Russia
  5. Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Department of Pharmacology, Chennai, India
  6. Al-Kut University College, School of Science and Engineering, Kut, Wasit, Iraq
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Synthetic modelling of the flood regime is based on the overall knowledge of the hydrological regime in a catchment. The Flow-duration-Frequency (QdF) modelling is used to combine three parameters characterising flood with its mean or exceeded flow, its characteristic duration, and occurrence frequency. Which of these can be established locally at the extreme mean volume flow rates of a catchment reference hydrometric station? The determination of the reference QdF model in mean (volume) and exceeded flows requires two characteristics reflecting the flood regime in a catchment. The first is the characteristic flood duration and the second is the 10-year quantile of the annual maximum instantaneous flow. The comparison of the local situation to the reference QdF models enables to develop the final QdF model of the catchment and therefore the baseline QdF for exceeded and synthetic mono-frequency hydrographs. These are essential components in the study of flood risk mapping and the estimation of the instantaneous peak distribution from mean daily streamflow series.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Sofiane Kourat
1
ORCID: ORCID
Bénina Touaïbia
1
ORCID: ORCID
Abdelhalim Yahiaoui
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. National Higher School of Hydraulic, Blida, Algeria
  2. University of Bouira, Institute of Technology, Rue Drissi Yahia, Bouira 10000, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Easy-to-handle and effective methods of juice clarification and concentration by membrane technologies are still under exploration. The current article presents results of research on the technological development of an alternative natural sweetener of high biological value and improved organoleptic properties. Sorghum saccharatum stem juice is used in research. It is pre-clarified enzymatically with α-amylase and glucoamylase, clarified by ultrafiltration, and concentrated by the direct contact membrane distillation in various temperature ranges. The study shows the efficacy of membrane methods for improving juice purity, total soluble solids ( TSS), and total sugar (TS) content in the syrup obtained. Clarification depends on membrane characteristics at the beginning of the process, as there are no differences at the end of it. Juice concentration at high-temperature differences allows to accelerate the process by approx. 60% comparing to low-temperature differences. A lower temperature difference ( ΔТ = 20–30°С) in the concentration process results in a longer process and syrup acidisation, whereas a higher temperature difference ( ΔТ = 70°С) affects physicochemical properties of syrup due to local overheating and formation of Maillard reaction products. The juice concentration at ΔТ = 50–60°С allows to obtain high values of total soluble solids without significant degradation of physicochemical and organoleptic properties.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Vadym Chibrikov
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Polina Vakuliuk
2
ORCID: ORCID
Nataliia Hryhorenko
3
Sergiy Gunko
4
ORCID: ORCID
Henryk Sobczuk
5
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Agrophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lublin, Poland
  2. National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv, Ukraine
  3. Institute of Bioenergy Crops and Sugar Beet of the NAAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
  4. National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
  5. Institute of Technology and Life Sciences – National Research Institute, Ave. Hrabska, 3, 05-090, Falenty, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The exceptionally high spatial-temporal variability of the river runoff and the significance of its transboundary component considerably worsen the problem of the water supply of the republic. Due to the disadvantageous geographical location in the lower reaches of transboundary river basins, the Republic of Kazakhstan is largely dependent on water economy activities taking place in neighbouring countries. In the article the modern change of the resources of river runoff in Kazakhstan, taking into account climatic and anthropogenic influences is considered. For the assessment of the impact of economic activities on the river runoff and changes in climatic-related runoff, the complex of integral methods was used, and appropriate methodologies were developed. The obtained results of the modern influence of a complex of factors, as well as their significance for the future (till 2030), can be used for the development of scientifically based solutions for sustainable management and protection of water resources. An assessment of the anthropogenic activity of this study shows that the water resources of the river runoff of the Republic of Kazakhstan have decreased by 16.0 km 3∙y –1. According to our forecasts, there will be a further decrease in the water resources of the republic due to the expected decrease in transboundary flow to 87.1 km 3∙y –1 by 2030, in dry years less than 50.0 km 3∙y –1. We propose a set of measures to prevent the negative impact of possible reduction of river runoff resources in the future in the water basins of Kazakhstan.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Aisulu Tursunova
1
ORCID: ORCID
Akhmetkal Medeu
1
ORCID: ORCID
Sayat Alimkulov
1
ORCID: ORCID
Assel Saparova
2
ORCID: ORCID
Gaukhar Baspakova
1 3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Institute of Geography and Water Security of the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Kabanbai batyr/Pushkin St, 67/99, Almaty, 050010, Republic of Kazakhstan
  2. Satbayev University, Satpaev St, 22a, Almaty, 050013, Republic of Kazakhstan
  3. Kazakh National Agrarian Research University, Faculty of Water, Land and Forest Resources, Abai Ave, 8, Almaty, 050010, Republic of Kazakhstan
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Global warming and climate change are some of the most widely discussed topics in today's society, and they are of considerable importance to agriculture globally. Climate change directly affects agricultural production. On the other hand, the agricultural sector is inherently sensitive to climate conditions, and this has made the agricultural sector one of the most vulnerable sectors to the effects of global climate change. Rising CO2 levels in the atmosphere, increased temperature, and altering precipitation patterns all substantially influence agricultural insect pests and agricultural productivity. Climate change has a number of implications for insect pests. They can lead to a decreased biological control effectiveness, particularly natural enemies, increased incidence of insect-transmitted plant diseases, increased risk of migratory pest invasion, altered interspecific interaction, altered synchrony between plants and pests, increase in the number of generations, increased overwintering survival, and increase in geographic distribution. As a consequence, agricultural economic losses are a real possibility, as is a threat to human food and nutrition security. Global warming will necessitate sustainable management techniques to cope with the altering state of pests, as it is a primary driver of pest population dynamics. Future studies on the impacts of climate change on agricultural insect pests might be prioritized in several ways. Enhanced integrated pest control strategies, the use of modelling prediction tools, and climate and pest population monitoring are only a few examples.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Alim Al Ayub Ahmed
1
ORCID: ORCID
Marziah Zahar
2
ORCID: ORCID
Vera Gribkova
3
ORCID: ORCID
Natalia Nikolaeva
3
Ngakan Ketut Acwin Dwijendra
4
ORCID: ORCID
Wanich Suksatan
5
ORCID: ORCID
Karrar Kamil Atiyah
6
ORCID: ORCID
Abduladheem Turki Jalil
7
ORCID: ORCID
Surendar Aravindhan
8
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Jiujiang University, School of Accounting, 551 Qianjin Donglu, Jiujiang, Jiangxi, China
  2. Universiti Utara Malaysia, School of Business Management, Sintok, Kedah, Malaysia
  3. Moscow State University of Technology and Management named after K.G. Razumovsky (The First Cossack University), Department of Biology, Moscow, Russia
  4. Udayana University, Faculty of Engineering, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia
  5. HRH Princess Chulabhorn College of Medical Science, Chulabhorn Royal Academy, Faculty of Nursing, Bangkok, Thailand
  6. Al-Ayen University, Faculty of Health, Dhi-Qar, Iraq
  7. Al-Mustaqbal University College, Medical Laboratories Techniques Department, Babylon, Hilla, Iraq
  8. Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Department of Pharmacology, Chennai, India
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Flood embankments have played an important role in flood protection systems for centuries. Tightness evaluation of water structures should result in determining whether floods may cause seepage incidents, consequently leading to their damage or even destruction. It is assumed that the time of water passage from the river to the protected area under steady-state conditions can be a good indicator of the embankment resistance to long-term water rise. The curve of water passage times shows the values obtained at different ordinates of the dammed water and can be regarded as a characteristic parameter of flood embankment tightness. Determination of the water passage time ( Tp) additionally requires finding the trajectory along which this time is the shortest possible. However, there is no need to analyse the unsteady filtration, which requires the determination of an initial condition and the course of time-dependent boundary conditions. Engineers in practice, often use the time Tpp which elapses from the beginning of flooding to the occurrence of seepage in the protected area. The relationship between the passage time ( Tp) and the seepage onset time ( Tpp) was analysed on a model example. Practical use of the curve of passage times is showed on the example of the reconstruction of the left-bank Warta embankment in the area of Konin.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Zbigniew Sroka
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Poznań University of Life Sciences, Faculty of Environmental and Mechanical Engineering, ul. Wojska Polskiego 28, 60-637 Poznań, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The study objective was to analyse the number of tourists present in the shore zone and bathing areas of lakes with regard to their tourist carrying capacity and the amount of biogenic substances potentially entering the ecosystem from the beach and bathing areas. The procedures from project between the EU and Poland, in the module “Development of the sanitary supervision of water quality” were used in three categories: physiological substances – sweat and urine; water-soluble and insoluble organic compounds; and biogenic elements – nitrogen and phosphorus. The research was conducted in two model mesotrophic lakes, Piaseczno and Zagłębocze, located in the Łęczna- Włodawa Lakeland (eastern Poland). The data were analysed in reference to biological trophic status indices defining the limnological status of lakes in the summer of 2014 and 2016. Analyses of gross primary production of phytoplankton using the light and dark bottles method and the analysis of chlorophyll a concentration were applied using the laboratory spectrophotometric method. The relatively small number of tourists recorded in the shore zone of both lakes did not exceed their tourist carrying capacity, and their potential contribution of biogenic substances to the lake ecosystems was small. Biological trophic indices for both lakes indicated that they had been continually late- mesotrophic for decades. The amount of biogenic substances directly linked to beach tourism usually has a minor effect on the limnological status of mesotrophic lakes. Due to the specific character of lake ecosystems, however, even small amounts of these substances can contribute to the destabilisation of the biocenotic system.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Artur Serafin
1
ORCID: ORCID
Antoni Grzywna
1
ORCID: ORCID
Renata Augustyniak
2
ORCID: ORCID
Urszula Bronowicka-Mielniczuk
3
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Department of Environmental Engineering and Geodesy, Lublin, Poland
  2. University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Department of Water Protection Engineering and Environmental Microbiology, Olsztyn, Poland
  3. University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Department of Applied Mathematics and Computer, Głęboka 28, 20-612 Lublin, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

One of the most important natural phenomena that causes harmful damage around the world is the occurrence of sudden and severe floods. There are various solutions to deal with floods. Among the structural measures of flood risk management, we can mention the construction of levee, detention basin, channel modification, and a combination of the mentioned measures. Manafwa is a flood-prone area in Uganda currently protected by a 6.6 m high levee. Unfortunately, the existing levee does not have ideal performance, and the probability of failure is very high. Therefore, the main purpose of this study is to compare seven flood management measures in the flood-prone area of Manafwa and to select the best flood risk management proposal. These management measures are: 1) construction of a levee with a height of 6.5 m, 2) construction of a levee with a height of 7 m, 3) construction of a levee with a height of 7.5 m, 4) construction of a levee with a height of 8 m, 5) channel modification, 6) detention basin and 7) a combination of structural measures of channel modification and detention basin. The results show that although building a levee with a height of 8 m is more expensive than other options, but it reduces the expected annual flood damage to about USD30.5 thous.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Ngakan K.A. Dwijendra
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ali Majdi
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Udayana University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Architecture, Bali 80361, Indonesia
  2. Al-Mustaqbal University College, Department of Building and Construction Techniques Engineering, Hilla, Iraq
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The Drentsche Aa catchment in The Netherlands, which has nearly untouched natural river valleys, is a designated Natura 2000 area. Agriculture is practiced on the adjacent higher-lying ground. A set of measures was drafted to achieve climate-proof solutions in the short term by reducing the effects of a drier climate on nature and agriculture. These measures must have no adverse effects. In order to check this, the Hunze and Aa’s Water Board investigated the feasibility of using groundwater for sprinkler irrigation in parts of the catchment. In the study, the SIMulation of GROundwater and surface water levels (SIMGRO) hydrological model was used in order to model future scenarios with different water level strategies and climate scenarios. The modelling examined various measures in the nature and agricultural areas to optimise the hydrological situation for both land use functions. In addition, the effect on the nature areas of abstracting groundwater for irrigation was determined for buffer zones of different widths. The findings have indicated the policy direction to be taken by both the water board and the province, as well as offer them opportunities to deal with the requests for withdrawals in the near future by the means of future-proof general rules.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Erik Querner
1
ORCID: ORCID
Jan den Besten
2
Rinke van Veen
3
Harry Jager
2

  1. Querner Consult, C.J. Blaauwstraat 38, 6709 DA Wageningen, The Netherlands
  2. Hunze & Aa’s Water Board, Veendam, The Netherlands
  3. Province of Drenthe, Assen, The Netherlands
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The purpose of the study presented in the article is to implement modern hydrographic characteristics of freshwater of the Shatsk Lakes (28 lakes in Volyn Polissya, Ukraine) by typing water bodies according to the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive, assessment of the chemical composition of lake water and bottom sediments (sapropel), determination of the opportunity for their recreational use in the special status of the district as a national park. Despite the presence of the two large lakes (Svityaz – 26.2 km 2 and Pulemetske – 15.5 km 2), very small lakes with a water surface area of less than 0.5 km 2 (64%) are dominating in the Shatsk group. Mineralisation of calcium-hydrocarbonate lake waters is 115–303 mg∙dm –3 and calcium-sulphate aqueous extract of sapropel is – 318–1451 mg∙dm –3. Using a Piper diagram, it was found that there is genetic homogeneity between surface and groundwater, indicating a significant share of groundwater in the water supply of lakes. There are eight species of sapropel deposits in 19 lakes of the district. A wide range of chemical composition and physical and mechanical properties of sapropel deposits of the Shatsk Lakes allow us to consider them as an important resource for agriculture and industry. We found that sapropel from Shatsk Lakes meets the requirements for therapeutic mud and can be used for therapeutic and health purposes.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Valentyn Khilchevskyi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Leonid Ilyin
2
ORCID: ORCID
Mykhailo Pasichnyk
2
ORCID: ORCID
Myroslava Zabokrytska
2
ORCID: ORCID
Olga Ilyina
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Department of Hydrology and Hydroecology, Kyiv, Ukraine
  2. Lesya Ukrainka Volyn National University, Faculty of Geography, 13 Voli Avenue, 43025, Lutsk, Ukraine
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

In order to determine the nature of the high salinisation rate of the waters of Lake Sidi Boughaba, which has been listed in the Ramsar list since 1980, 23 samples that were taken during four sampling operations were subjected to physicochemical analyses. The obtained results were processed using a combination of bi-varied methods (correlation tests) and multivariate statistical methods (principal component analysis – PCA). The physicochemical analyses reveal that they are alkaline waters with a pH ranging between 8.38 and 9.03, an electrical conductivity ( EC) of the order of 12.4 to 17.4 mS∙cm –1, and high levels of Na + and Cl , up to 3700 and 6630 mg∙dm –3 respectively, indicating a marine origin of these waters. In addition, the statistical treatment revealed that the mineralisation of the waters of this ecosystem is controlled by four main mechanisms of the salinisation; the main mechanism underlying this strong mineralisation is due to the impact of the marine spray. The second-order processes are about the phenomenon of the ion exchange, the dissolution/precipitation of evaporitic and carbonate formations, the oxidation–reduction processes, notably the reduction of sulphates as well as biochemical phenomena due to the selective absorption of certain ions by fauna and flora.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Mohamed Lachhab
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mohamed Najy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Fatima Zahra Talbi
2 3
ORCID: ORCID
Aziz Taouraout
1
ORCID: ORCID
Mohamed El Qryefy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hassan Ech-Chafay
1
ORCID: ORCID
Driss Belghyti
1
ORCID: ORCID
Khadija El Kharrim
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. University Ibn Tofail, Faculty of Sciences, Natural Resources and Sustainable Development Laboratory, BP 133, 14000 Kenitra, Morocco
  2. Hassan First University of Settat, Faculty of Sciences and Technologies, Laboratory of Biochemistry, Neurosciences, Natural Resources and Environment, Settat, Morocco
  3. Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah University, Faculty of Sciences Dhar El Mahraz, Laboratory of Biotechnology, Conservation and Valorization of Naturals Resources (LBCVNR), Fez, Morocco
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

In the present research, a scripting cartographic technique for the environmental mapping of Ethiopia using climate and topographic datasets is developed. The strength of the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) is employed for the effective visualisation of the seven maps using high-resolution data: GEBCO, TerraClimate, WorldClim, CRUTS 4.0 in 2018 by considering the solutions of map design. The role of topographic characteristics for climate variables (evapotranspiration, downward surface shortwave radiation, vapour pressure, vapour pressure deficit and climatic water deficit) is explained. Topographic variability of Ethiopia is illustrated for geographically dispersed and contrasting environmental setting in its various regions: Afar, Danakil Depression, Ethiopian Highlands, Great Rift Valley, lowlands and Ogaden Desert. The relationships between the environmental and topographic variables are investigated with aid of literature review and the outcomes are discussed. The maps are demonstrated graphically to highlight variables enabling to find correlations between the geographic phenomena, their distribution and intensity. The presented maps honor the environmental and topographic data sets within the resolution of the data. Integration of these results in the interpretation maps presented here brings new insights into both the variations of selected climate variables, and the topography of Ethiopia.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Polina Lemenkova
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), École polytechnique de Bruxelles (Brussels Faculty of Engineering), Laboratory of Image Synthesis and Analysis, Building L, Campus de Solbosch, Avenue Franklin Roosevelt 50, Brussels 1000, Belgium
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Aquaculture plays a great role in producing foodstuffs, sustaining inland capture fisheries and providing employment. The key to future development in pond aquaculture is diversification of production technology, intensity, and function connected to increasing the environmental value of pond areas. New production systems involve a combination of intensive and extensive pond culture, increasing productivity and improving nutrient utilisation and fish species diversification. The most important principle of these systems is the possibility to use the wastes from intensive aquaculture as the input for extensive, environment-friendly fish production. These systems were proven to be profitable and sustainable in tropical and subtropical areas. However, for temperate climatic conditions, such data are scarce. For this reason, we decided to discuss modifications that, in our opinion, can be applied in an extensive part of the integrated intensive-extensive system in temperate climatic conditions in order to increase the overall productivity of the pond aquaculture.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Ludmiła Kolek
1
ORCID: ORCID
Ilgiz Irnazarow
1
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Polish Academy of Science, Institute of Ichthyobiology and Aquaculture in Gołysz, Zaborze, Kalinowa St 2, 43-520 Chybie, Poland
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

More than 4.6 mln ha in the Russian Federation are irrigated. Their culvert hydraulic structures are part of network structures and are the most widespread. After the crisis of the 1990s, proper maintenance of many reclamation systems was impossible due to a lack of funds. This led to the loss of about half of the water taken from irrigation sources in irrigation canals. The planned increase in the technical level of irrigation systems requires the automation of the operation of both the entire system as a whole and separately located culverts. This will avoid significant losses of water supply for irrigation and prevent water shortages with the insufficient discipline of water users. Means of hydraulic automation of water supply are being installed on small irrigation canals in Russia. A water flow regulating valve is proposed, with no mechanical movinparts, and gates are not involved in the control process. The operation of the structure is based on the injection effect, in which excess water entering the downstream with a decrease in water consumption begins to circulate between the outlet section of the transit pipe and the diffuser at the end section of the valve. Using the methods of measuring hydrodynamics and the theory of jet devices, theoretical dependences were obtained, which make it possible to determine the main hydraulic characteristics of the structure. The design form of the flow part of the regulator has been developed and a physical model has been made. In a mirror hydraulic flume, the operation modes of the water outlet were studied with and without regulation. The actual values of hydraulic parameters were obtained, which confirmed the validity of the use of theoretical dependencies. The discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental results is within the experimental error. It has been proven that it is possible to circulate excess water between the downstream and intermediate pools of the regulator.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Dmitrii M. Benin
1
Vera L. Snezhko
1

  1. Russian State Agrarian University – Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy, Timiryazevskaya St, 49, Moscow, 127550, Russia
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

This study is the evaluation of the coagulation efficiency of the aluminum sulfate on the removal of catechol and pyrogallol. The study has focused on the impact of inorganic components of hardness Algerian waters. Jar-test trials were conducted on the two phenolic compounds dissolved in distilled water only, which was later enriched with minerals. Several reaction parameters varied, including the effect of pH and the influence of the salt content, and this approach yielded a better understanding of interaction between phenolic compounds and calcium/magnesium salts. The results indicate that the process efficiency depends on the number and position of OH in molecules. The main mechanisms would be either a physical adsorption, an exchange of ligand, or complexation on the floc surface of aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, the addition of inorganic salts appears to improve removal efficiency of tested phenolic compounds and have an effect on the optimal pH range for coagulation.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Lynda Hecini
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hassen Boukerker
2
ORCID: ORCID
Wahida Kherifi
1
ORCID: ORCID
Abdelkarim Mellah
1
ORCID: ORCID
Samia Achour
2
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Scientific and Technical Research Center for Arid Areas (CRSTRA), M.B. 1682 Biskra 07000, Algeria
  2. University of Biskra, Laboratory in Underground and Surface Hydraulics (LARHYSS), Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Civil Engineering and Hydraulics, Biskra, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

Potato from the Solanaceae family is one of the most important crops in the world and its cultivation is common in many places. The average yield of this crop is 20 Mg·ha –1 and it is compatible with climatic conditions in many parts of the world. The experiment studied the possibility of exogenous regulation of the adaptive potential available for four potato cultivars through the use of growth stimulants with different action mechanisms: 24-epibrassinolide (EBL) and chitosan biopolymer (CHT). The results allowed us to establish significant differences in growth parameters, plant height, leaf index, vegetation index, chlorophyll content, and yield structure. Monitoring growth and predicting yields well before harvest are essential to effectively managing potato productivity. Studies have confirmed the empirical relationship between the normalised difference vegetation index ( NDVI) and N-tester vegetation index data at various stages of potato growth with yield data. Statistical linear regression models were used to develop an empirical relationship between the NDVI and N-tester data and yield at different stages of crop growth. The equations have a maximum determination coefficient (R 2) of 0.63 for the N-tester and 0.74 for the NDVI during the flowering phase (BBCH 1 65). NDVI and N-tester vegetation index positively correlated with yield data at all growth stages.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Aleksandra V. Shitikova
1
Adewale A. Abiala
1
Alexander A. Tevchenkov
1
Svetlana S. Bazhenova
1
Nikolay N. Lazarev
1
Evgeniya M. Kurenkova
1

  1. Russian State Agrarian University – Moscow Timiryazev Agricultural Academy, Department of Plant Production and Meadow Ecosystems, Timiryazevskaya St. 49, Moscow, 127422, Russia
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The hemostasis system is designed to ensure the integrity of the body’s internal environment, stop bleeding, and maintain a liquid state of blood in the vascular channel. Modern biological and veterinary science presents highly fragmented and scarce data containing clinical and diagnostic clotting characteristics in different fish species. An essential point emphasising the practical component of such studies is spontaneous thrombus formation in fish farming described in the literature. The present research is devoted to the study of the functional state of plasma hemostasis in some ray- finned commercial fishes: phylogenetically more ancient cartilaginous ganoids – sturgeon Acipenser baerii and hybrid of sterlet A. ruthenus and starred sturgeon A. stellatus, as well as bony fishes – carp Cyprinus carpio and tilapia Oreochromis niloticus. It should be noted that the current study was performed at the aquaculture development center “AquaBioCenter” of VSDFA from 2015 to 2020. Species-specific features of clotting were revealed: activation by common and extrinsic pathways, characterised by thrombin time ( TT), prothrombin time ( PT), and fibrinogen concentration, is several times faster in cartilaginous ganoids than in both bony fish species; hemostasis with activation of the intrinsic pathway, characterised by activated partial thromboplastin time ( APTT), is faster in hybrids and tilapias, in contrast to carps and sturgeons. Content of soluble fibrin monomer complexes ( SFMC) in all fish was higher than in dogs and humans but lower than in cattle. The highest amount of SFMC was detected in carps, the lowest – in cartilaginous ganoids.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Holya Alobaidy
1
ORCID: ORCID
Hayder Dawood Saleem
2
ORCID: ORCID
Aiman Mohammed Baqir Al-Dhalimy
3 4
ORCID: ORCID

  1. Al-Nisour University College, College of Science, Nisour Square Tunnel 8934+85M, Baghdad, Iraq
  2. Al-Manara College For Medical Sciences, Department of Dentistry, Misan, Iraq
  3. Altoosi University College, College of Nursing, Najaf, Iraq
  4. Islamic University of Najaf, Najaf, Iraq
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The objective of this study is to assess the physical-chemical quality of urban wastewater from the city of Boumerdès, in northern Algeria with regard to the threshold values for irrigation or their discharge in aquatic ecosystems. Five sampling points were carried out of the study area in April 2017. The results obtained of physical- chemical parameters indicating pollution show that the water course is exposed to pollution mainly of organic origin. It’s expressed by a high maximum value according to Algerian and World Health Organisation standards: chemical oxygen demand ( COD 886 mg O 2∙dm –3), biochemical oxygen demand ( BOD 5 490 mg O2∙dm –3), nitrate (NO 3 73.09 mg∙dm –3), nitrite (NO 2 6 mg∙dm –3), ammonium (NH 4 + 23 mg∙dm –3) and phosphates (PO 4 3– 7.3 mg∙dm –3). The COD to BOD 5 rate of 1.8, show that the effluents must be treated before being discharged into the receiving environment. However, it is lower than 2, which makes them easily biodegradable and can be treated by a biological system such as a natural lagoon. It shows also a diversified origin of the pollution. It is predominantly domestic origin, it could have an adverse effect on public health, presenting a risk of environmental eutrophication, contamination of soil and water resources. The physical-chemical characterisation of the urban wastewater shows that they are quite loaded and present a pollution in nitrogenous compounds, a treatment is requested before the direct discharge to the receiving environment or their reuse in the irrigation.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Djalal Ait Baziz
1
ORCID: ORCID
Abdelhak Maazouzi
1
Salih Lachache
2

  1. Tahri Mohamed University, Faculty of Technology, Mechanical Engineering Department, Laboratory of Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, B.P. 417, Independence St., 08000, Kenadsa, Bechar, Algeria
  2. University Center of Nour Bachir El-Bayadh, Institute of Sciences, El Bayadh, Algeria
Download PDF Download RIS Download Bibtex

Abstract

The growing population and the development of industries in all countries of the world have created a very important and complex issue for water supply to cities. Today, many parts of the world are facing the problem of water shortage and this problem cannot be easily solved. In addition to the proper use of water resources and preventing the loss of natural water, the establishment of regional water supply networks is effective in meeting the future needs of the people. A water distribution network (water supply network) is a set of interconnected pipelines used to transport and distribute water in a complex. In designing the water distribution network, factors such as the type of water distribution network, water pressure, water velocity, design flow, minimum pipe diameter, pipe material and many other factors should be considered. In this study, we have tried to design the water supply network of a part of Balikpapan city in Indonesia. The design method led to the determination of pressure values in the connection nodes, pipe diameters, flow rate and velocity in the pipes. All the existing criteria are considered in the design of the water supply network. Although this study has been implemented for a specific study area, it can be of great help to designers in designing the water supply network.
Go to article

Authors and Affiliations

Dinh T.N. Huy
1 2
ORCID: ORCID
Ngakan K.A. Dwijendra
3
ORCID: ORCID
Andrey Poltarykhin
4
Wanich Suksatan
5
ORCID: ORCID
Nooraldeen S. Nahi
6
ORCID: ORCID
Trias Mahmudiono
7
ORCID: ORCID
Nguyen T. Hai
8
ORCID: ORCID
Mustafa M. Kadhim
9
ORCID: ORCID
Krishanveer Singh
10
ORCID: ORCID
Alim A.A. Ahmed
11
ORCID: ORCID

  1. International University of Japan, School of Finance and Banking, Minamiuonuma, Japan
  2. Banking University of HCMC, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  3. Udayana University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Architecture, Kampus Bukit, Jl. Raya Kampus Unud Jimbaran, Kec. Kuta Sel., Kabupaten Badung, Bali, 80361, Indonesia
  4. Plekhanov Russian University of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation
  5. Chulabhorn Royal Academy, HRH Princess Chulabhorn College of Medical Science, Faculty of Nursing, Bangkok, Thailand
  6. Al-Ayen University, College of Health and Medical Technology, Department of Optics, Dhi-Qar, Iraq
  7. Airlangga University, Faculty of Health, Surabaya, Indonesia
  8. Thuongmai University, Faculty of Engineering, Hanoi, Vietnam
  9. Al-Farahidi University, Medical Laboratory Techniques Department, Baghdad, Iraq
  10. GLA University, Department of Business Management, Mathura, India
  11. Jiujiang University, School of Accounting, Jiujiang, China

Instructions for authors

Authors should submit manuscripts via the Editorial Board ( Editorial system - Submit Your Manuscript )


1. "Journal of Water and Land Development” is published four times a year in English, articles are followed by a short (not exceeding 200 words) summary in Polish.
2. Conciseness of style is a prequisite, avoid verbose phrases and abvious statements. Manuscript should not exceed 1 printing sheet (20 standard pages of 1800 characters per page). Tables, figures and short summary should be typed at the end of the paper on separate pages.
3. Each article should contain the following elements: title, name and surname of the author(s), authors' affiliation, short abstract no longer than 150–200 words, key words, text of the paper divided into Introduction, Material and Methods, Results and Discussion, References (arranged in alphabetic order as shown below) and summary in Polish BENCALA K.E., WALTERS R.A. 1983. Simulation of solute transport in mountain pool-and riffle stream: a transient storage model. Water Resources Research. Vol. 19 p. 718–724. GÓRECKI A. 1987. Rozpoznanie i opis sztucznych pól odniesień przestrzennych [Recognition and description of the artificial plots of spatial relations]. Manuscript. Wrocław. Uniwersytet Wrocławski pp. 18. JANKOWSKI M. 2006. Elementy grafiki komputerowej [Elements of the computer graphics]. Warszawa. WNT. ISBN 8320431638 pp. 220. STRZELECKI T. 1994. Rola systemów informacji geograficznej w zarządzaniu państwem, województwem i gminą. W: Komputerowe wspomaganie badań naukowych [The role of GIS in the management of the state, voivodship and community. In: Computer aided research]. I Konferencja Środowiskowa. Wrocław. Wrocławskie Towarzystwo Naukowe p. 19–25. Papers referred to should be quoted in the text as KOWALSKI [1997], [KOWALSKI, NOWAK 1997]. If there are more than two authors, please add et al. after the first name i.e. NOWAK et al. [1997]. English version of the non-congress language title should be added in brackets.
4. Figures should be draw on tracing paper or delivered as laser printouts. Legends in the graphs should be restricted to numerical and letter descriptions, other explanations should be placed in the figure caption. Descriptions remaining within the graph should be in English and of the proportional size (i.e. they must ensure readability after graph size reduction).
5. Tables should fit to the width (16 cm) and height (24 cm) of the column.
6. Data illustrated in Figures should not appear in Tables and vice versa.
7. All variables in equations and in the text should be written in italic. Use SI units in the form g·cm–3 and not g/ml.
8. Manuscript should be sent in three copies with tables, graphs and English abstract and Polish summary with title and key words on separate pages. Enclose a floppy disc with the text written in Word for Windows with tables and figures saved in separate files.

Template
Use the article template to format your article - TEMPLATE.pdf or TEMPLATE.docx

Similarity Check Plagiarism Screening System
The editorial board is participating in a growing community of Similarity Check System's users in order to ensure that the content published is original and trustworthy. Similarity Check is a medium that allows for comprehensive manuscripts screening, aimed to eliminate plagiarism and provide a high standard and quality peer-review process. Detailed description of the Similarity Check System can be found at: www.crossref.org/services/similarity-check/


Due to the current situation, the Journal of Water and Land Development has suspended scientific cooperation with Russian and Belarusian institutions as of February 24, 2022. Unfortunately, manuscripts from these countries will not be accepted for publication in our journal until further notice.


Payment fee:
1600 PLN +23%VAT or 300€ including 23% VAT*
(paper about 0.5 publishers sheet = 20,000 characters with spacies or 1,500 cm2 of figures).
For a volume exceeding 0.5 sheets, additionally paid in proportion to the exceedance.
*Bank transfer should be done as OUR (The transfer fees are expected to be paid before you initiate the transfer. This means the transfer amount is expected to be delivered in full to the beneficiary).

Konto bankowe (dane do przelewu krajowego):
Nazwa: Instytut Technologiczno-Przyrodniczy - Państwowy Instytut Badawczy
Adres: Falenty, al. Hrabska 3, 05-090 Raszyn
Bank: Alior Bank S.A. BIC (Swift- code): ALBPPLPW
Numer rachunku: PL40 2490 0005 0000 4530 9244 4533

Bank account for EUR payments:
Name: Institute of Technology and Life Sciences - National Research Institute
Address: Falenty, 3 Hrabska Avenue, Raszyn 05-090, Poland
Bank: Alior Bank S.A.
BIC (Swift- code): ALBPPLPW
Account number: IBAN - PL88 2490 0005 0000 4600 8830 5411






Additional info

Abstracting & Indexing

Journal of Water and Land Development is covered by the following services:

AGRICOLA (National Agricultural Library)

AGRIS

AGRO

Arianta

Baidu Scholar

Cabell's Whitelist

CABI (over 50 subsections)

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) - CAplus

Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) - SciFinder

CNKI Scholar (China National Knowledge Infrastructure)

CNPIEC - cnpLINKer

Current Geographical Publications Dimensions

DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)

EBSCO (relevant databases)

EBSCO Discovery Service

Engineering Village

Genamics JournalSeek

GeoArchive

GeoRef

Google Scholar

Index Copernicus

Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)

J-Gate

JournalGuide

JournalTOCs

KESLI-NDSL (Korean National Discovery for Science Leaders)

Microsoft Academic

MyScienceWork

Naver Academic

Naviga (Softweco)

POL-index

Polish Scientific Journals Contents

Primo Central (ExLibris)

ProQuest (relevant databases)

Publons QOAM (Quality Open Access Market)

ReadCube

Reaxys

SCImago (SJR)

SCOPUS

Semantic Scholar

Sherpa/RoMEO

SIGZ

Summon (ProQuest)

TDNet

Ulrich's Periodicals Directory/ulrichsweb

WanFang Data

WorldCat (OCLC)

Publication Ethics Policy

ETHICAL PRINCIPLES

Editors of the "Journal of Water and Land Development" pay attention to maintain ethical standards in scientific publications and undertake any possible measure to counteract neglecting the standards. Papers submitted for publication are evaluated with respect to reliability, conforming to ethical standards and the advancement of science. Principles given below are based on COPE's Best Practice Guidelines for Journal Editors, which may be found at:
http://publicationethics.org/files/u2/Best_Practice.pdf

Authors’ duties

Authorship
Authorship should be limited to persons, who markedly contributed to the idea, project, realization and interpretation of results. All of them have to be listed as co-authors. Other persons, who affected some important parts of the study should be listed or mentioned as co-workers. Author should be certain that all co-authors were enlisted, saw and accepted final version of the paper and agreed upon its publication.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Author should disclose all sources of financing of his/her study, the input of scientific institutions, associations and other subjects and all important conflicts of interests that might affect results and interpretation of the study.

Standards in reporting
Authors of papers based on original studies should present precise description of performed work and objective discussion on its importance. Source data should be accurately presented in the paper. The paper should contain detailed information and references that would enable others to use it. False or intentionally not true declarations are not ethical and are not accepted by the editors.

Access to and storage of data
Authors may be asked for providing raw data used in the paper for editorial assessment and should be prepared to store them within the reasonable time period after publication.

Multiple, unnecessary and competitive publications
As a rule author should not publish papers describing the same studies in more than one journal or primary publication. Submission of the same paper to more than one journal at the same time is not ethical and prohibited.

Confirmation of sources
Author should cite papers that affected the creation of submitted manuscript and every time he/she should confirm the use of other authors’ work.

Important errors in published papers
When author finds an important error or inaccuracy in his/her paper, he/she is obliged to inform Editorial Office about this as soon as possible.

Originality and plagiarism
Author may submit only original papers. He/she should be certain that the names of authors referred to in the paper and/or fragments of their texts are properly cited or mentioned.

Ghostwriting
Ghost writing/guest authorship are manifestation of scientific unreliability and all such cases will be revealed including notification of appropriate subjects. Signs of scientific unreliability, especially violation of ethical principles in science will be documented by the Editorial Office.


Duties of the Editorial Office


Editors’ duties
Editors know the rules of journal editing including the procedures applied in case of uncovering non-ethical practices.

Decisions on publication
Editor-in Chief is obliged to apply present legal status as to defamation, violation of author’s rights and plagiarism and bears the responsibility for decisions. He/she may consult thematic editors and/or referees in that matter.

Selection of referees
Editorial Office provides appropriate selection of referees and takes care about appropriate course of peer –reviewing (the review has to be substantive).

Confidentiality
Every member of editorial team is not allowed to disclose information about submitted paper to any person except its author, referees, other advisors and editors.

Discrimination
To counteract discrimination the Editorial Office obeys the legally binding rules.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Not published papers or their fragments cannot be used in the studies of editorial team or ref-erees without written consent of the author.


Referees' duties

Editorial decisions

Referee supports Editor-in-Chief in taking editorial decisions and may also support author in improving the paper.

Back information
In case a selected referee is not able to review the paper or cannot do it in due time period, he/she should inform secretary of the Editorial Office about this fact.

Objectivity standards
Reviews should be objective. Personal criticism is inappropriate. Referees should clearly ex-press their opinions and support them with proper arguments.

Confidentiality
All reviewed papers should be dealt with as confidential. They should not be discussed or revealed to persons other than the secretary of the Editorial Office.

Anonymity
All reviews should be made anonymously and the Editorial Office does not disclose names of the authors to referees.

Disclosure and conflict of interests
Confidential information or ideas resulting from reviewing procedure should be kept secret and should not be used to gain personal benefits. Referees should not review papers, which might generate conflict of interests resulting from relationships with the author, firm or institution involved in the study.

Confirmation of sources
Referees should indicate publications which are not referred to in the paper. Any statement that the observation, source or argument was described previously should be supported by appropriate citation. Referee should also inform the secretary of the Editorial Office about significant similarity to or partial overlapping of the reviewed paper with any other published paper and about suspected plagiarism.

Peer-review Procedure

Reviewing procedure

Procedure of reviewing submitted papers agrees with recommendations of the Ministry of Science and Higher Education published in a booklet: „Dobre praktyki w procedurach recenzyjnych w nauce”.
http://www.nauka.gov.pl/g2/oryginal/2014_02/307f933b1a75d6705a4406d5452d6dbf.pdf

Reviewing form may be downloaded from the Journal’s web page.

1. Papers submitted to the Editorial Office are primarily verified by editors withrespect to merit and formal issues. Texts with obvious errors (formatting other than requested, missing references, evidently low scientific quality) will be rejected at this stage.
2. Primarily accepted papers are sent to the two independent referees from outside the author’s institution, who:
  • have no conflict of interests with the author,
  • are not in professional relationships with the author,
  • are competent in a given discipline and have at least doctor’s degree and respective scientific achievements,
  • have unblemished reputation as reviewers.
3. In case of papers written in foreign language, at least one referee is affiliated in a foreign institution other than the author’s nationality.
4. Reviewing proceeds in the double blind process (authors and reviewers do notknow each other’s names) recommended by the Ministry.
5. A number is attributed to the paper to identify it in further stages of editorial procedure.
6. Potential referee obtains summary of the text and it is his/her decision upon accepting/rejecting the paper for review within a given time period.
7. Referees are obliged to keep opinions about the paper confidential and to not use knowledge about it before publication.
8. Review must have a written form and end up with an explicit conclusion about accepting or rejecting the paper from publication. Referee has a possibility to conclude his/her opinion in a form:
  • accept without revision;
  • accept with minor revision;
  • accept after major revision,
  • re-submission and further reviewing after complete re-arrangement of the paper,
  • reject.
9. Referee sends the review to the journal “Woda-Środowisko-Obszary Wiejskie”and “Problemy Inżynierii Rolniczej”by e-mail and in the printed undersigned form to the Editorial Office. Referee sends the review to the “Journal of Water and Land Development”by Editorial System. The review is archived there for 5 years.
10. Editors do not accept reviews, which do not conform to merit and formal rules of scientific reviewing like short positive or negative remarks not supported by a close scrutiny or definitely critical reviews with positive final conclusion and vice versa. Referee’s remarks are presented to the author. Rational and motivated conclusions are obligatory for the author. He/she has to consider all remarks and revise the text accordingly. Referee has the right to verify so revised text.
11. Author of the text has the right to comment referee’s conclusions in case he/she does not agree with them.
12. Editor-in Chief (supported by members of the Editorial Board) decides upon publication based on remarks and conclusions presented by referees, author’s comments and the final version of the manuscript.
13. Rules of acceptation or rejection of the paper and the review form are available at the web page of the Editorial House or the journal.
14. Once a year Editorial Office publishes present list of cooperating reviewers.
15. According to usual habit, reviewing is free of charge.
16. Papers rejected by referees are archived at the Editorial Office for 5 years.

Reviewers

Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2020

Prof. Aminuddin Ab Ghani - River Engineering and Urban Drainage Research Centre (REDAC), Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Abdelaziz Abdallaoui - Moulay Ismail University, Morocco
Assoc. Prof. Fahmy Abdelhaleem - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Dr. Yahiaoui Abdelhalim - Institute of Technology, University of Bouira, Algeria
Prof. Khaldi Abdelkrim - University of Science and Technology of Oran, Algeria
Dr. Jazuli Abdullahi - Near East University, Nicosia Cyprus
Prof. Taleb M. Abu-Sharar - University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
Prof. Bachir Achour - University of Biskra, Algeria
Dr. Mariusz Adynkiewicz – Piragas Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - National Research Institute, Poland
Prof. Mukhtar Ahmed - PMAS Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakistan; Washington State University, Pullman, USA; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden
Dr. Hayder Alalwan - Technical of Petrochemical, Middle Technical University, Iraq
Dr. Arif Alam - COMSATS University Islamabad, Abbottabad Campus, Pakistan
Dr. Hudhaifa maan Al-Hamndi - Tikrit University, Iraq
Assoc. Prof. Ali Al-Hillo - University of Wasit, Iraq
Dr. Ammar Ali - Wageningen University, The Netherlands
Dr. Sayed Sabab Ali - Hanyang University South Korea, Korea (South)
Prof. Mehush Aliu - University of Mitrovica, Albania
Dr. Miran Al-Rammahi - University of Liverpool, United Kingdom
Assoc. Prof. Abdalrahman Alsulaili - Kuwait University, Safat, Kuwait
Dr. Raid Al-Tahir - University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago
Dr. Mohd Anees - Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Jacek Antonkiewicz - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Nadjadji Anwar - Institut Teknologi Surabaya, Indonesia
Prof. Younas Aouine - Ibn Zohr University, Cité Dakhla, Agadir, Morocco
Prof. Klaus Appenroth - Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany
Dr. Maria Adelaide Araujo Almeida - Polytechnic Institute of Beja, Portugal
Dr. Ozan Artun - Cukurova University in Adana, Turkey
Dr. Kentaka Aruga - Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Saitama City, Japan
Prof. Atilgan Atilgan - Isparta University of Applied Sciences, Turkey
Dr. Imen Ayadi - Higher Institute of Water Sciences and Techniques of Gabes, Tunisia
Assoc. Prof. Neveen Badawy - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Dr. Attoui Badra - Laboratory of Geology Badji Mokhtar University-Annaba, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Hutaf Baker - Al al-Bayt University, Mafraq, Jordan
Dr. Monika Balawejder - PWSTE The Bronisław Markiewicz State University of Technology and Eco-nomics in Jarosław, Poland
Prof. Ildefonso Baldiris-Navarro - Universidad de Cartagena, Colombia
Dr. Andres Barajas-Solano - Universidad Francisco de Paula Santander, Colombia
Prof. Icela Barcecó-Qiuntal- Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico City, Mexico
Dr. Arash Barjasteh - Khuzestan Water & Power Authority (KWPA), Iran
Prof. Erum Bashir - University of Karachi, Karach, Pakistan
Assoc. Prof. Łukasz Bąk - Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Mohamed Salah Belksier - University of Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Master Al-Amin Bello - Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Lahcen Benaabidate - University of Sidi Mohamed Ben Abdellah, Fès, Morocco
Dr. Aziz Benhamrouche - Ferhat Abbas University of Setif, Algeria
Master Ali Berghout - University of Bejaia, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Nka Nnomo Bernadette - Institute of Geological and Mining Research, Yaounde, Cameroon
Master Suraj Bhagat - Ton Duc Thang University, Viet Nam
Prof. Vijaya S. Bhaskara Rao - Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India
Assoc. Prof. Muhammad Binbakar - Universiti Utara Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Sumantra Biswas - Jawaharlal Nehru University/ Sukumar Sengupta Mahavidyalaya, New Delhi, India
Prof. Inga Bochoidze - Akaki Tsereteli State University, Kutaisi, Georgia
Assoc. Prof. Ilirjana Boci - University of Tirana, Albania
Prof. Andrzej Bogdał - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Nikolay I. Bogdanovich - Northern (Arctic) Federal University, Arkhangelsk, Russia
Dr. Gokcen Bombar - Izmir Katip Celebi University, Turkey
Prof. Ognjen Bonacci - Split University, Croatia
Assoc. Prof. Małgorzata Bonisławska - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Dariusz Borowiak - University of Gdańsk, Poland
Dr. Frits Bos - CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis, The Hague, Netherlands
Prof. Hamid Bouchelkia - University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Master Mourad Boussekine - Badji Mokhtar University, Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Housseyn Bouzeria - Abou Bakr Belkaid University of Tlemcen, Algeria.
Dr. Andrzej Brandyk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Assoc. Prof. John Buchanan - University of Tennessee, United States
Prof. Piotr Bugajski - University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Ewa Burszta-Adamiak - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Erni Butar-Butar - Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Indonesia
Prof. Javier Cancela - University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Dr. Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles - University of Barcelona, Spain
Dr. Rushan Ceka - South East European University, Skopje, North Macedonia
Assoc. Prof. Peter Cepuder - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Simona Ceschin - Università Degli Studi Roma Tre, Rome, Italy
Assoc. Prof. Cem Polat Cetinkaya - Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir, Turkey
Prof. Kwok-Wing Chau - Hong Kong Polytechnic University, China
Assoc. Prof. Abdelbaki Chérifa - Abou Bakr Belkaid, University, Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Younghyun Cho - K-water Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea (South)
Master Susan Cooper - King’s College London, United Kingdom
Dr. Agnieszka Cupak - Uniwersytet Rolniczy, Poland
Prof. Isa Curebal - Balıkesir University, Turkey
Prof. Stanisław Czaban - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Justyna Czajkowska - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Wojciech Czekała - Poznan University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Przemyslaw Czerniejewski - Westpomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski - Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Dr. Ammar Dawood - University of Basrah, Iraq
Dr. Paweł Dąbek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rutger de Graaf - University of Amsterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Loris Deirmendjian - Paul Sabatier University - Toulouse III, France
Assoc. Prof. Tamene Demissie - Jimma University, Ethiopia
Dr. Gustavo Díaz - University of Concepción, Chile
Assoc. Prof. Alsayed Dowidar - Hydraulics Research Institute - National Water Research Center, Shoubra El-Kheima, Egypt
Prof. Krzysztof Dragon - Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Sniazhana Dubianok - Central Research Institute for Complex Use of Water Resources (CRICUWR), Minsk, Belarus
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Anarbekova Gulshat Dzhumabaevna - Kazakh National Agrarian University, Almaty, Kazakhstan
Dr. Hefni Effendi - Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia
Prof. Youssef El Guamri - Regional Centre for Careers of Education and Training, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Mokhtari Elhadj - University of Hassiba Ben Bouali Chlef, Algeria
Dr. Alaa El-Hazek - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt
Assoc. Prof. Abdeslam El-Jouni - Centre regional des Métiers de l’Education et de la Formation : CRMEF Tanger, Morocco
Prof. Mahmoud El-Tokhy - Benha University, Cairo, Egypt.
Prof. Evens Emmanuel - Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Dr. María Esper Angillieri - Universidad Nacional de San Juan (UNSJ), Argentina
Prof. Alisher Fatxulloev - Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers, Uzbekistan
Assoc. Prof. Daniel Fomina - Kazan National Research Technological University, Russia
Dr. Mattias Gaglio - University of Ferrara, Italy
Dr. Małgorzata Gałczyńska - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili - Georgian Technical University, Tbilisi, Georgia
Dr. Paweł Gełesz - Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk, Poland
Dr. Yevheniy Gerasimov - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Said Ghabayen - Natural Resources Conservation, Princeton, United States
Dr. Abbas Gholami - Shoaml University, Amol, Iran
Prof. Daniela Gogoase Nistoran - Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Dora Gomez - Universidad Pedagogica Nacional, Colombia
Dr. Ganzorig Gonchigsumlaa - Mongolian University of Life Sciences, Zaisan, Mongolia
Prof. Andrzej Greinert - University of Zielona Gora, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Antoni Grzywna - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. M.H.J.P. Gunarathna - Rajarata University of Sri Lanka, Mihintale, Sri Lanka
Assoc. Prof. Robert Gwiazda - Institute of Nature Conservation of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Mohamed Habi - Tlemcen University, Algeria
Dr. Major Habiba - Badji Mokhtar University – Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Peter Halaj - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Master Wiktor Halecki - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Dr. Abderrahmane Hamimed - Mascara University, Algeria
Prof. Lahoucine Hanich - Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Donny Harisuseno - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Jakub Heciak - Kielce University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Henny Herawati - Tanjungpura University, Indonesia
Dr. Chaffai Hicham - Badji Mokhtar University – Annaba University, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Saeed Hoodfar - Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
Prof. larbi Houichi - University of Batna 2, Algeria
Prof. Lyudmyla Hranovska - Institute of Irrigated Agriculture of NAAS, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Věra Hubačíková - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Katarzyna Ignatowicz - Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Masango Ilunga - University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Master Zhuldyzay Iskakova - Institute of Hydrogeology and Geoecology named after U.M. Ahmedsafina, Al-maty, Kazakhstan
Dr. Mateusz Jakubiak - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Grzegorz Janik - Wrocław University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Anna Januchta-Szostak - Poznan University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Elżbieta Jasińska - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Joanna Jaskuła - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Bartosz Jawecki - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Sabrine Jemai University of Sfax, Tunisia
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Raimundo Jiménez-Ballesta - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
Prof. Csaba Juhász - University of Debrecen, Hungary
Dr. Grzegorz Kaczor - Uniwersytet Rolniczy w Krakowie, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Grzegorz Kaczor - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Mohammed Kadaoui - University Mohammed Premier, Oujda, Morocco
Master Sharad Kadbhane - Maratha Vidya Prasarak Samaj's, Karmaveer Adv. Baburao Ganpatrao Thakare College of Engineering, Nashik, India
Dr Dariusz Kayzer - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Kałuża - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Joanna Kamińska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ibrahim Kane - Umaru Musa Yar'adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Dr. Vasyl Karabyn - Lviv State University of Life Safety, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Agnieszka Karczmarczyk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Robert Kasperek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kiyonori Kawasaki - Kagawa University, Japan
Dr. Mina Khosravi - Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran, Iran
Dr. Borys Khrystyuk - Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Institute, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Marianne Koller-Peroutka - University of Vienna, Austria
Prof. Anna Kołodziejczak - Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz - AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland
Dr. Tomasz Kotowski - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Zile Alex Kouadio - Université Jean Lorougnon Guédé, Daloa, Ivory Coast
Prof. Victor Kovalchuk - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko - Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation of NAAS of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Adam Kozioł - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Piotr Krajewski - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Irina Krish - Vladimir State University, Russia
Prof. Natalia Kuczyńska-Kippen - Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland
Dr. Deepak Kumar - G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology, Pantnagar, India
Dr. Karolina Kurek - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Dr. Stanisław Lach - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Lenka Lackóová - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra; Slovak Republic
Prof. László Lakatos - Eszterhazy Karoly University (The University of Eger), Hungary
Assoc. Prof. Maciej Lasocki - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Niharika Lata - National Institute of Technology Patna, India
Dr. Okanlade Lawal-Adebowale - Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria
Dr. Jeffrey León Pulido - EAN University, Bogota, Colombia
Dr. Jaakko Leppänen - University of Helsinki, Finland
Assoc. Prof. Jacek Leśny - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Han Lijian - Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Prof. Lily Limantara - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Prof. Fedor Lisetskii - Belgorod State National Research University, Belgorod, Russia
Prof. Jurik Lubos - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Jaafar Maatooq - University of Technology, Baghdad, Iraq
Master Mohd Mahamud - Universiti Sains Malaysia, George Town, Malaysia
Prof. Myroslav Malovanyy - Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Dr. Eduardo Martínez-Gomariz - Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Spain
Costantino Masciopinto - National Research Council, Rome, Water Research Institute, Bari, Italy
Dr. Natalya Matvienko - Institute of Fisheries of the National Academyof Agrarian Sciences, Kyiv 03164, Ukraine
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Bruno Mazzorana - Universidad Austral de Chile
Dr. Agnieszka Mąkosza - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Lakhdar Mebarki - University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Mohamed Meddi - Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Hydraulique, Blida, Algeria
Dr. Ali Mehran - University of North Georgia, United States
Dr. José Alberto Herrera Melián - University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
Dr. Orest Melnichuk - Institute of Ecology and Geography, Academy of Sciences, Kishinev, Moldova
Prof. Leopoldo Mendoza-Espinosa - Autonomous University of Baja California, Ensenada, Mexico
Dr. Gabriel Minea - National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Małgorzata Mirecka - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Dorota Mirosław-Świątek - Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Dariusz Młyński - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Dariusz Młyński - University of Agriculture in Kraków, Poland
Prof. Djidel Mohamed - Université Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Dr. Amir Molajou - Iran University of Science & Technology, Iran
Prof. Changho Moon - Kunsan National University, Korea (South)
Assoc. Prof. Matthew Morris - Ambrose University, Calgary, Canada
Prof. Józef Mosiej - Warsaw University of Life Scieces -SGGW, Poland
Prof. Jacek Motyka - AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Dounia Mrad - University Badji Mokhtar Annaba, Algeria
Dr. Basil Mugonola - Gulu University (GU), Uganda
Prof. Zainal Muktamar - University of Bengkulu, Indonesia
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi - University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Magdalena Myszura - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Marco Napoli - University of Florence, Italy
Dr. Arkadiusz Nędzarek - West Pomeranian University of Technology, Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Jacek Niedźwiecki - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Constantin Nistor - University of Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Ainin Niswati - Lampung University, Indonesia
Dr. Tomasz Noszczyk - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Vahid Nourani - University of Tabriz, Iran
Prof. Laftouhi Noureddine - Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Washington Nyabeze - WR Nyabeze and Associates, Johannesburg, South Africa
Dr. Clement Nyamekye - Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
Prof. Ryszard Oleszczuk - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Amal Omer - Desert Research Center, Cairo, Egypt., Egypt
Prof. El-Sayed Omran - Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt
Dr. David Onu - Federal College of Education, Zaria
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Petra Oppeltová - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Mehmet Ali Ozler - Mugla Sitki Kocman University, Turkey
Assoc. Prof. Carmen Palau - Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain
Prof. Zuzana Palkova - Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Avinash Pandey - Metahelix Life Science Ltd., Bangalore, India
Assoc. Prof. Ghanshyam Patle - Central Agricultural University Imphal, India
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Zbigniew Piepiora - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski - Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Oleg Pinchuk - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Santosh Pingale - National Institute of Hydrology Roorkee, India
Dr. Mikołaj Piniewski - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Agatha Piranti - Jenderal Soedirman University, Indonesia
Assoc. Prof. Karol Plesiński - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Ryszard Pokładek - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec - University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Master Katja Polotzek - Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden, Germany
Dr. BVG Prasad - DR Y.S.R. Horticultural University, Andhra Pradesh, India
Dr. Michaela Prescott - Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Dr. Wiesław Ptach - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Antonio Pulido Bosch - University of Almeria, Spain
Assoc. Prof. Doni Putra - Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Dr. Erik Querner - Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Assoc. Prof. Kinga Racoń-Leja - Cracow University of Technology, Kraków, Poland
Dr. Koteswara K. Rao - Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India
Dr. Iwan Ridwansyah - Indonesian Institute of Sciences, Jakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Anatoliy Rokochinsky - National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Joanna Rodziewicz - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Roman Rolbiecki - UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Stanislav Ruman - University of Ostrava, Czech Republic
Dr. Holger Rupp - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Halle, Germany
Dr. Katarzyna Rymuza - University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Poland
Prof. Andrii Safonyk National University for Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Carlos Salazar-Briones - Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali, Mexico
Assoc. Prof. Luqmon Samiev - Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanization Engineers, Uzbekistan
Dr. Abba Sani Isah - Yusuf Maitama Sule University, Kano, Nigeria, Nigeria
Dr. Veronica Sarateanu - Agriculture Faculty, Banat's University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine "King Michael I of Romania", Timisoara, Romania
Prof. Miklas Scholz - Lund University, Sweden
Prof. Moosa Sedibe - Central University of Technology, Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Dr. Joanna Sender - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Marcus Senra - Unversidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil
Dr. Artur Serafin - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Muhammad Setiawan - Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Abdol Aziz Shahraki - Regional Studies, The Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden
Dr. Andrzej Shatkowski - Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation, Kharkiv, Ukraine
Dr. Abdrabbo Shehata AbouKheira - Water Management Research Institute, El Qanater El Khayreya, Egypt
Dr. Rituraj Shukla - University of Guelph, Canada
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec - Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Sergiy Snizhko - Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Chen Soo - Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, Kota Samarahan, Malaysia,
Dr. Marcin Spychała - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rafał Stasik - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tatyana Stefanovska - National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Dr. Radosław Stodolak - Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ery Suhartanto - University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Lagudu Surinaidu - National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad, India
Prof. Dwita Sutjiningsih - University of Indonesia, Depok , Indonesia
Assoc. Prof. Serhiy Syrotyuk - Lviv National Agrarian University, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Sandor Szalai - Szent István University, Godollo, Hungary
Dr. Jan Szatyłowicz - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulc - Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski - Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kassa Tadele - Arba Minch University, Ethiopia
Dr. Kassahun Tadesse - University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Dr. Samuel Takele - National Institute of Meteorological Sciences, Seogwipo-si, Jeju-doKorea (South)
Prof. Fatima Zohra Tebbi - University of Batna, Algeria
Prof. Alo Tito - Department of Water Engineering and Chemistry, Italy
Prof. Mukesh Tiwari - Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India
Dr. Katarzyna Tokarczyk-Dorociak - Wrocław Universiy of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rachid Touir - Centre Régional des Métiers de l’Éducation et de la Formation (CRMEF), Rabat, Morocco
Le Tu - Nong Lam University, Ho Chi Minh City, Viet Nam
Prof. Serghiy Vambol - Kharkiv National Technical University of Agriculture after P. Vasilenko, Ukraine
Dr. Iryna Vaskina - Sumy State University, Ukraine
Prof. Magdalena Vaverková - Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Dr. Ileana Vera-Reyes - Centro de Investigación en Química Aplicada, Mexico, Mexico
Prof. Aliaksandr Volchak - Brest State Technical University, Belarus
Prof. Jan Vymazal - Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Czech Republic
Dr. Tong Wang - Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Rafal Wawer - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Master Wessam Wessam - Agricultural Engineering Research Institute, Giza, Egypt
Dr. Ewa Wiśniowska - Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Woch - Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Małgorzata Wojtkowska - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Lu Xiwu - Southeast University, Nanjing, China
Prof. Mamuye Yusuf - Jimma University, Ethiopia
Prof. Mariusz Zadworny - Czestochowa University of Technology (CUT) Faculty of Civil Engineering, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Liliana Zaharia - University of Bucarest, Romania
Dr. Kateb Zakaria - Tlemcen University, Algeria
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki - Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Aziez Zeddouiri - University of Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Bakenaz A. Zeidan - Tanta University, Egypt
Dr. Noureddine Zenati - University of Messaadia Med Cherif, Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Hamsa Zubaidi - Oregon State University, Corvallis, United States
Dr. Tomasz Zubala - University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik - University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski - UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland


Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2019

Prof. Yahiaoui Abdelkrim – University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Habib Abida – University of Sfax, Tunesia Tjahyo Adji – Univesitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia
Prof. Klaus Appenroth – Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany
Dr Maria Adelaide Araujo Almeida – Polytechnic Institute of Beja, Portugal
Dr Eli Argaman – Soil Erosion Research Station, Ministry of Agriculture, Rishon Lezion, Israel
Dr John Awu – National Centre for Agricultural Mechanization, Ilorin, Nigeria
Prof. Aleksandra Badora – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Arturas Bautrenas – Vilnius Unversity, Vilnius, Lituania
Dr. Aleksanda Bawiec – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Łukasz Bąk – Kielce University of Technology, Kielce, Poland
Prof. Bourhane Belabed – Badji Mokhtar – Annaba University, Algeria
Dr. Tomasz Bergel – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Ramon Bienes –Instituto Madrileño de Investigación y Desarrollo Rural Agrario y Alimentario, Madrid, Spain
Dr. Małgorzata Biniak-Pieróg – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Bogdał – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Alaba Boluwade – McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Prof. Hamid Bouchelkia – University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Andrzej Brandyk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Dr. Piotr Bugajski – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr Ewa Burszta-Adamiak – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Irena Burzyńska – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr Agnieszka Bus – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Hazir Çadraku – University for Business and Technology, Pristina, Kosovo
Prof. Bogdan Chojnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrea Cominola – Technische Universität Berlin, Germany
Dr. Agnieszka Cupak – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Dr. Justyna Czajkowska – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Czerwionka – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Ewa Dacewicz – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Jacek Dach – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jan Damicz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski – Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Dr Paweł Dąbek – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Poland
Prof. Halina Dąbkowska-Naskręt – University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Oussama Derdous – Université Kasdi Merbah Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Jean Diatta – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jean-Christophe Diepart – Université de Liège, Belgium
Dr Bujar Durmishi – University of Tetova, North Macedonia
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Mahmoud El-Tokhy – Benha University, Egypt
Prof. Evens Emmanuel – Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Dr. Tomasz Falkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Fernando Fan – Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Prof. Janos Fehér – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Dr. Beata Fortuna-Antoszkiewicz – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Junior Garcia – Universidade Federal do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil
Prof. Wiesław Gądek – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili – Georgian Water Managment Institute, Tbilisi, Georgia
Assoc. Prof. Małgorzata Gałczyńska – West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Poland
Dr Paweł Gełesz – Academy of Fine Arts in Gdańsk, Poland
Dr Jakub Gołębiewski – West Pomeranian University of Technology Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Renata Graf – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Rutger de Graaf – Hogeschool Rotterdam, Netherlands
Dr. Antoni Grzywna – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Adam Górecki – Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Górecki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Asssoc. Prof. Burak Gürel – Koç University,Istanbul, Turkey
Prof. Mohamed Habi – University of Tlemcen, Algeria
Dr. Peter Halaj – Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Younes Hamed – Gafsa University, Tunisia
Dr. Mateusz Hammerling – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. prof. Paweł Hanus – AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow, Poland
Dr Henny Herawati – Tanjungpura University, Pontianak, Indonesia
Dr Edyta Hewelke – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Nur Islami – Universitas Riau, Pekanbaru, Indonesia
Assoc. prof. Darja Istenič – University of Ljubljana, Slovenia
Assoc. prof. Mohammad Hossein Jahangir – University of Tehran, Iran
Prof. Anna Januchta-Szostak – Poznan University of Technology, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Anna Jaroszewicz – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. prof. Bartosz Jawecki – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Csaba Juhász – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Prof. Pierre Y. Julien – Colorado State University, Fort Collins, United States
Prof. Edmund Kaca – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Kaczor – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Assoc. prof. Eliza Kalbarczyk – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Kałuża – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Agnieszka Karczmarczyk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr Ignacy Kardel – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Cezary Kaźmierowski – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Kamel Khanchoul – Badji Mokhtar – Annaba University, Algeria
Dr. Adam Kiczko – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Kisiel – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Oleksandr Klimenko – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Apoloniusz Kodura – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Silvia Kohnová – Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Prof. Tomasz Kolerski – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Dr Katarzyna Kołecka – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz – AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Assoc. prof. Radovan Kopp – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Ján Koščo – University of Presov, Slovak Republic
Prof. Viktor Kovalchuk – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko – Ukrainian Academy of Agricultural Engineering and Land Reclamation, Kiev, Ukraine
Assoc. prof. Tomasz Kowalczyk – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Alina Kowalczyk-Juśko – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Michał Kozłowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Kozyra – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation, Puławy, Poland
Dr Piotr Krajewski – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Katarzyna Krężałek – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Mykhailo Kropyvko – Natsional′nyy Naukovyy Tsentr "Instytut Ahrarnoyi Ekonomiky", Kiev, Ukraine
Prof. Zygmunt Kruczek – University of Physical Education in Cracow, Poland
Dr. Michł Kubrak – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Bogdan Kulig – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Karolina Kurek – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Kustamar Kustamar – Institut Teknologi Nasional Malang, Indonesia
Prof. Marek Kułażyński – Wroclaw University of Science and Technology, Poland
Dr. Stanisław Lach –AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Prof. László Lakatos – Eszterhazy Karoly University, Eger, Hungary
Prof. Krzysztof Lejcuś – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Przemysław Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland,
Dr Jaakko Leppänen – Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo
Prof. Daniel Liberacki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Lily Limantara – University of Brawijaya, Indonesi
Dr. Wiesława Lizińska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Imed Loukam – Mohamed-Cherif Messaadia University, Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Prof. Jurik Lubos – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Andrzej Łachacz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Michał Łopata – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Chandra Madramootoo – McGill University, Montreal, Canada
Prof. Boutiba Makhlouf – University of Science and Technology Houari Boumediene, Algeria
Prof. Małgorzata Makowska – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Myroslav Malovanyy – Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Assoc. Prof. Andrii Martyn – National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev,Ukraine
Dr. Michał Marzec –University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Jakub Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Constantine Mbajiorgu – University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria
Assoc. Prof. Monika Mika – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Gabriel Minea – National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Romania
Dr. Małgorzata Mirecka – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Dariusz Młyński – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Prof. Changho Moon – Kunsan National University, South Korea
Prof. Viktor Moshynskyi – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Ukraine
Prof. Józef Mosiej – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Rachedi Mounira – Université Chadli Bendjedid -El Tarf, Algeria
Dr. Dounia Mrad – Badji Mokhtar - Annaba University, Algeria
Dr Somphinith Muangthong – Rajamangala University of Technology Isan, Nakorn Ratchasima, Thailand
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi – University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Reinhard Nolz – Institute of Hydrology, Slovak Academy of Sciences (IH SAS), Slovakia, Slovak Republic
Dr. Michael Nones – Institute of Geophysics Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Lucyna Nyka – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Hanna Obarska-Pempkowiak – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Oleniacz – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ednah Onyari –University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Petra Oppeltová – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Zuzana Palkova – Slovak University of Agriculture, Nitra, Slovak Republic
Assoc. Prof. Jana Pařílková – Brno University of Technology, Brno, Czech Republic
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof. Parylak – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Anna Pawlikowska-Piechotka – Józef Piłsudski University of Physical Education, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Grzegorz Pęczkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Roman Petrus – Ignacy Łukasiewicz Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Janina Piekutin – Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski – Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Dr. Santosh Pingale – Arba Minch University, Ethiopia
Dr. Karol Plesiński – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr Sandra Poikane – European Commission, Joint Research Cenre, Brussles, Belgium
Prof. Ryszard Pokładek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Popek – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Dorota Porowska – Warsaw University, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Brbara Prus – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Wioletta Przystaś – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Dr. Erik Querner – Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Dr. Kinga Racoń-Leja – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Anatoliy Rokochinskyi – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Roman Rolbiecki – UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Giovanna Rossato – Progetto CMR, Milan, Italy
Dr. James Roumasset – University of Hawaii at Mānoa, Hawaii, United States
Dr. Oleksandr Rudik – Kherson State Agrarian University, Ukraine
Dr. Holger Rupp – Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig, Germany
Dr. Kamila Rybczyńska-Tkaczyk – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Dr. Katarzyna Rymuza – University of Natural Sciences and Humanities in Siedlce, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Anrzej Samborski – The State School of Higher Education in Zamość, Poland
Dr. Artur Serafin – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Lublin, Poland
Prf. Abdelkader Seyd – Université Kasdi Merbah de Ouargla, Algeria
Dr. Tamara Shevchenko –O.M. Beketov National University of Urban Economy in Kharkiv, Ukraine
Prof. Vasil Simeonov – University of Sofia „St. Kliment Ohridski”, Bulgaria"
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Zdzisław Skutnik – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Karolina Smarzyńska – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Sobota – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Sojka – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Reza Sokouti – West Azarbaijan Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and Training Center, AREEO, Uromieh, Iran
Prof. Joaquín Solana-Gutiérrez – Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain
Prof. Krystyna Solarek – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tatiana Solovey – Polish Geological Institute, Warsaw, Poland
Dr Piotr Sołowiej – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr Urszula Somorowska – University of Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Cristina Sorana Ionescu– Polytechnic University of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Marcin Spychała – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Piotr Stachowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Radosław Stodolak – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr Jan Szatyłowicz – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Tomasz Szymczak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Anna Tofiluk – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Iryna Vaskina – Sumy State University, Sumy, Ukraine
Prof. Jan Vymazal – Czech University of Life Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic
Dr. Rafał Wawer – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Mirosław Wiatkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Joanna Wibig – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Dr. Joanna Wicher-Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ewelina Widelska – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr Paweł Wilk – Polish Institute of Meteorology and Water Management, Warsaw, Poland
Dr. Justyna Wójcik-Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Krishna Yadav – Bundelkhand University Jhansi, India
Assoc. Prof. Işil Yildirim – Beykent Üniversitesi, Istanbul, Turkey
Dr. Ewa Zabłocka-Godlewska – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Zadworny – Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Ewelina Zając – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jan Zarzycki – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Dr. Paweł Zawadzki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Bakenaz A. Zeidan – Tanta University, Egypt
Dr. Tomasz Zubala – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Zwoliński – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski – University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Miroslaw Żelazny – Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Żyromski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland

Journal of Water and Land Development – List of reviewers – 2018

Prof. Aminuddin Ab Ghani – Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia
Prof. Yahiaoui Abdelkrim – University of Bechar, Algeria
Prof. Habib Abida – University of Sfax, Tunisia
Prof. Mehush Aliu – University of Mitrovica, Albania
Dr. B. Boudad – Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco
Dr. Sofia Bahroun – Badji Mokhtar University of Annaba, Algeria
Assoc. Prof. Sławomir Bajkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Łukasz Bąk – Kielce University of Technology, Kielce, Poland
Prof. Kazimierz Banasik – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Dr. Aliyu Salisu Barau – Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
Prof. Icela Barcecó-Qiuntal – Metropolitan Autonomous University, Mexico City, Mexico
Dr. Kirk L. Barnett – Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Australia
Prof. Moussa Benhamza – Badji Mokhtar University, Annaba, Algeria
Prof. Tomasz Bergel – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Małgorzata Biniak-Pieróg – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jan Bondaruk – Central Mining Institute, Katowice, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Brodziński – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krystyna Bryś – Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Science, Wrocław, Poland
Prof. Teresa Brzezińska-Wójcik – Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, Lublin, Poland
Prof. Piotr Bugajski – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Bykowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Vincent Chaplot – Pierre and Marie Curie Unversity – Paris 6, France
Prof. Bogdan Chojnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wojciech Czekala – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Robert Czerniawski – University of Szczecin, Poland
Prof. Przemyslaw Czerniejewski – West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland
Assoc. Prof. Krzysztof Czerwionka – Gdańsk Uniwersity of Technology, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Czyżyk – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences. Falenty, Poland
Dr. Paweł Dąbek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Jolanta Dąbrowska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ralf Dannowski – Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Land Use Research, Germany
Prof. Bożena Dębska – UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Dr. Yousfi Djaffar – National Center for Space Technology, Algeria
Prof. Wojciech Dobicki – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Rebecca S. Dodder – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, North Carolina, United States
Dr. Tomasz Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Evens Emmanuel – Quisqueya University, Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Prof. Andrzej Eymontt – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Falkowski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Krzysztof Fortuniak – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Gądek – Cracow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Magdalena Gajewska – Gdansk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Renata Gamrat – West Pomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin, Poland
Dr. Givi Gavardashvili – Georgian Water Managment Institute, Tbilisi, Georgia
Dr. Yevheniy Gerasimov – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Dr. Abbas Gholami – Shoaml University, Amol, Iran
Prof. Daniela Gogoase Nistoran – University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Iurii Golubinka – Lviv Polytechnic National University, Ukraine
Dr. Roopali V. Goyal – Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel Institute of Technology, Vasad, India
Prof. Ryszard Gołdyn – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Jolanta Grochowska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Jacek Grzyb – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Antoni Grzywna – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Younes Hamed – Gafsa University, Tunisia
Prof. Eko Handayanto – University of Brawijaya, Indonesia
Dr. Helvi Heinonen-Tanski – University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
Dr. Leszek Hejduk – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Beata Hejmanowska – AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, Poland
Prof. Piotr Ilnicki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jerzy Jeznach – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Krzysztof Jóżwiakowski – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Prof. Csaba Juhász – University of Debrecen, Hungary
Prof. Tibangayuka Kabanda – North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Prof. Edmund Kaca – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Kałuża - Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Andrzej Kapusta – Inland Fisheries Institute, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Nouha Kaouachi – Mouhamed Sherif Messaadia University of Souk-Ahras, Algeria
Dr. Willia Khati – University of Chadli Ben Djedid, El-Tarf, Algeria
Prof. Abdul Khan – University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan
Dr. Adam Kiczko – Warsaw University of Life Sciences - SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Kisiel – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Dr. Małgorzata Kleniewska – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Iwona Kłosok-Bazan – Opole University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Silvia Kohnová – Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Slovak Republic
Prof. Tomasz Kolerski – Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Marek Kopacz – AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Prof. Pyotr Kovalenko – Ukrainian Academy of Agricultural Engineering and Land Reclamation, Kiev, Ukraine
Dr. Agnieszka Kowalczyk – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Krasiński – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Janusz Kubrak – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Karolina Kurek – University of Agriculture of Krakow, Poland, Poland
Dr. Rekha Kushwaha – University of Kentucky, Lexington, United States
Dr. Stanisław Lach –AGH University of Science and Technology, Krakow, Poland
Dr. Lenka Lackóová – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Dr. Günter Langergraber – University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria
Prof. Krzysztof Lejcuś – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Przemysław Leń – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland,
Prof. Jacek Leśny – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Daniel Liberacki – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Zhaoewei Liu – Tsinghua University, Beijing, China
Prof. Wiesława Lizińska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Jurik Lubos – Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Slovak Republic
Prof. Andrzej Łachacz – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Carmen Maftei – Ovidius University of Constanta, Romania
Prof. Artur Magnuszewski – University of Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Grzegorz Majewski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Małgorzata Makowska – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Krystyna Malińska – Czestochowa University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Jacky Mania – Lille 1 University, France
Prof. Petro Martynyuk – National University of Water and Environmental Engineering, Rivne, Ukraine
Prof. Viktor Maxin – National University of Life and Environmental Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Prof. Małgorzata Mazurek – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Jakub Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Mazurkiewicz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Stanisław Mejza – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Maria Teresa Melis – University of Cagliari, Italy
Prof. Marta Menéndez Fernández –University of León, Spain
Prof. Monika Mika – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Dr. Gabriel Minea –National Institute of Hydrology and Water Management, Bucharest, Romania
Prof. Sevastel Mircea – University of Agronomic Science and Veterinary Medicine, Bucharest, Romania
Dr. El-Hadj Mokhtari – University of Hassiba Ben Bouali, Chlef, Algeria
Dr. Piotr Moniewski – Regional Inspectorate of Environmental Protection in Lodz, Poland
Prof. Józef Mosiej – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Amitouche Mourad – M’Hamed Bouguerra University of Boumerdes, Algeria
Prof. Ismet Mulliqi – University of Mitrovica "Isa Boletini", Albania
Dr. Tommaso Musner –University of Padua, Italy
Prof. Fulbert Namwamba – Southern University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
Prof. Abdelazim Mohamed Abdelhamid Negm – Zagazig University, Egypt
Prof. Irena Niedźwiecka-Filipiak – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Kamil Nieścioruk – University of Life Sciences in Lublin, Poland
Dr. Witold Nocoń – Silesian University of Technology, Gliwice, Poland
Prof. Laftouhi Noureddine – Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Dr. Mojtaba Noury – Islamic Azad University, Malard Branch, Malard, Iran
Dr. Eugeniusz Nowocień – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Oleniacz – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Beata Olszewska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Ednah Onyari –University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Dr. Agnieszka Operacz – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Bogdan Ozga-Zieliński – Institute of Meteorology and Water Management - State Research Institute, Warsaw, Poland
Prof. Katarzyna Pawęska – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Jan Pawełek – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jan Pawlak – Institute of Technology and Life Sciences, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Grzegorz Pęczkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Velta Persova – Latvian Agricultural University, Jelgava, Latvia
Prof. Edward Pierzgalski – Forest Research Institute, Sękocin, Poland
Prof. Stefan Pietrzak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Dr. Iwona Pińskwar – Institute for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Karol Plesiński – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Ryszard Pokładek – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Agnieszka Policht-Latawiec – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Popek – Warsaw University of Life Scieces – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Prakash D. Porey – Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology, Surat; Indian Society for Hydraulics, Khadakwasla; Indian Society for Wind Engineering, India
Dr. Erik Querner – Querner Consult, Wageningen, Netherlands
Dr. S. Abdul Rahaman – Bharathidasan University, Tiruchirappalli, India
Prof. Tomasz Rozbicki – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Prof. Roman Rolbiecki - University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Master Suhaila Sahat – Universiti Tun Hussein Onn, Parit Raja, Malaysia
Dr. Roberto Serrano-Notivoli – University of Zaragoza, Spain
Prof. Abdol Aziz Shahraki – The Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Dr. Tamara Shevchenko –O.M. Beketov National University of Urban Economy in Kharkiv, Ukraine
Dr. Sergey Shevchuk – Institute of Water Problems and Land Reclamation of the National Academy of Agrarian Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv, Ukraine
Master Kodicherla Shiva Prashanth Kumar – Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China
Prof. Vasil Simeonov – University of Sofia „St. Kliment Ohridski”, Bulgaria"
Prof. Umesh Singh – Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Prof. Tadeusz Siwiec – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Mirosław Skorbiłowicz – Bialystok University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Izabela Skrzypczak – Rzeszow University of Technology, Poland
Dr Andrzej Skwierawski – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Mariusz Sojka – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Adam Sokołowski – University of Gdansk, Poland
Dr. Marcin Spychała – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Sroka – Wrocław University of Science and Technology, Poland
Prof. Piotr Stachowski – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Rafał Stasik – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Ruzica Stricevic – University of Belgrade, Serbia
Prof. Bagong Suyanto – Airlangga University, Surabaya, Indonesia
Prof. Lech Szajdak – Institute for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poznań, Poland
Prof. Szymon Szewrański – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Wiesław Szulczewski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Maciej Szwast – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Tomasz Szymczak – Institute of Technology and Life Science, Falenty, Poland
Prof. Edmund Tomaszewski – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Prof. Waldemar Treder – Research Institute of Horticulture, Skierniewice, Poland
Dr. Krzysztof Ukalski – Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Poland
Dr. Andrés Vargas – Pontifical Xavierian University, Bogota, Colombia
Prof. Magdalena Vaverková – Mendel University in Brno, Czech Republic
Prof. Liana Vuta – University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania
Dr. Raphael Wambua – Egerton University, Kenya
Dr. Rafał Wawer – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Prof. Mirosław Wiatkowski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Joanna Wibig – University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland
Dr. Joanna Wicher-Dysarz – Poznań University of Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Barbara Wiśniowska-Kielian – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Franciszek Woch – Institute of Soil Science and Plant Cultivation - State Research Institute, Puławy, Poland
Dr. Nurul hila Zainuddin – Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Malaysia
Prof. Jarosław Zawadzki – Warsaw University of Technology, Poland
Prof. Aziez Zeddouiri – University of Ouargla, Algeria
Prof. Abdel Razik Ahmed Zidan – Mansoura University, Egypt
Prof. Agnieszka Zwirowicz-Rutkowska – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland
Prof. Zbigniew Zwolinski – Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland
Dr. Tymoteusz Zydroń – University of Agriculture in Krakow, Poland
Prof. Jacek Żarski –UTP University of Science and Technology, Bydgoszcz, Poland
Prof. Miroslaw Żelazny – Jagiellonian University, Cracow, Poland
Prof. Romuald Żmuda – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Prof. Andrzej Żyromski – Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland
Dr. Anna Źróbek-Sokolnik – University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland

This page uses 'cookies'. Learn more