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Abstract

The Bogdanka coal mine, the only currently operating mine in the Lublin Coal Basin (LCB), extracts coal from the Upper Carboniferous formations of the LCB. The average sulfur content in the No. 385/2 seam is 0.98%, while in the case of the No. 391 seam it is slightly higher and amounts to 1.15%. The iron sulfides (pyrite and marcasite) in bituminous coal seams form macroscopically visible massive, vein, and dispersed forms. A microscopic examination has confirmed their complex structure. Massive forms contain euhedral crystals and framboids. The sulfide aggregations are often associated with a halo of dispersed veins and framboids. Pyrite and marcasite often fill the fusinite cells. Framboids are highly variable when it comes to their size and the degree of compaction within the carbonaceous matter. Their large aggregations form polyframboids. The cracks are often filled with crystalline accumulations of iron sulfides (octaedric crystals). The Wavelenth Dispersive Spectrometry (WDS) microanalysis allowed the chemical composition of sulfides in coal samples from the examined depoists to be analyzed. It has been shown that they are dominated by iron sulfides FeS2 – pyrite and marcasite. The examined sulfides contain small admixtures of Pb, Hg, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Co, Ni, As, and Cd. When it comes to the examined admixtures, the highest concentration of up to 0.24%, is observed for As. In addition, small amounts of galena, siderite, and barite have also been found in the examined coal samples. The amounts of the critical elements in the examined samples do not allow for their economically justified exploitation. Higher concentrations of these elements can be found in the ashes resulting from the combustion process.
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Abstract

Measurements were made of sediment characteristics, benthic microbial activity and optimum temperature for sulfate reduction at Signy Island, South Orkney Islands, Antarctica . There was little evidence to support any seasonal variation in oxygen penetration of surface sediments. Oxygen penetrated to only 1.5 to 3 mm throughout the year, despite bioturbation from a dense amphipod population. The distribution of acid volatile sulfides increased with depth below 1 cm and above this, surface sediments were lighter in colour and contained fewer sulfides. The rates of sulfate reduction increased during winter under sea-ice cover, and remained high after ice break up. Seasonal water temperature was relatively constant between –1.8 and 0.5°C. Optimum temperature for anaerobic sediment respiration was investigated using different substrates and was found to be in the range 17–27°C, suggesting that sulfate reducing bacteria are psychrotolerant as they were inhibited by low temperatures.
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