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Abstract

The transition of power grids to implement large amounts of nonsynchronous renewables reduces the inertia in the power system. Therefore, the rate of change of frequency (ROCOF) after a fault of given energy is higher in low inertia grids than in grids with mainly synchronous machines operating. Standard faults for the design of existing synchronous machines assume fixed frequency grids, in which an electrically close fault happens. It is not tested, if the machines can ride through transient disturbances with high ROCOF. For ROCOF values of up to 1 Hz/s as foreseen for the upcoming grid code of the Republic of Ireland and up to 2 Hz/s for Northern Ireland, a thorough verification, if generators are capable to ride through such events is necessary. For this study, ROCOF frequency traces provided by the transmission system operators (TSOs) of Ireland were first benchmarked with a full-grid model and in a second step impressed on a model of generators connected to the power grid via a step-up transformer to study transient stability and nonlinear response of the generator. This paper focusses on the ability of nine different synchronous machines to stay connected to the transmission system during severe ROCOF events without losing synchronism.
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Abstract

Commonly, the Park model is used to calculate transients or steady-state operations of synchronous machines. The expanded Park theory derives the Park equations from the phase-domain model of the synchronous machine by the use of transformations. Thereby, several hypothesis are made, which are under investigation in this article in respect to the main inductances of two different types of synchronous machines. It is shown, that the derivation of the Park equations from the phase-domain model does not lead to constant inductances, as it is usually assumed for these equations. Nevertheless the Park model is the most common analytic model of synchronous machines. Therefore, in the second part of this article a method using the evolution strategy is shown to obtain the parameters of the Park model.
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Abstract

Long transmission lines have to be compensated to enhance the transport of active power. But a wrong design of the compensation may lead to subsynchronous resonances (SSR). For studies often park equivalent circuits are used. The parameters of the models are often determined analytically or by a three-phase short-circuit test. Models with this parameters give good results for frequencies of 50 Hz and 100 Hz resp. 60 Hz and 120 Hz. But SSR occurs at lower frequencies what arises the question of the reliability of the used models. Therefore in this publication a novel method for the determination of Park equivalent circuit parameters is presented. Herein the parameters are determined form time functions of the currents and the electromagnetic moment of the machine calculated by transient finite-element simulations. This parameters are used for network simulations and compared with the finite-element calculations. Compared to the parameters derived by a three-phase short-circuit a significant better accuracy of simulation results can be achieved by the presented method.
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