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Number of results: 19
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Abstract

This article outlines the rise and development of popular science periodicals in Poland from the 18th century until 1939. Their history begins in 1758 with the publication of Nowe Wiadomości Ekonomiczne i Uczone [Latest Economic and Learned News]. Our corpus includes 128 periodicals representing a great diversity of formats and content.
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Abstract

Marta Hirschprung (born in Cracow in 1903, died 1942?) was a journalist, translator, editor of the children’s magazine Okienko na Świat (A Little Window on the World) and author of countless articles for the press. This article is an attempt at finding out the forgotten facts from her life and reconstructing her biography. While analyzing her contributions to the Gazeta Żydowska (The Jewish Newspaper) in 1940–1942, special attention is paid to her editorial work on its children’s supplements Nasza Gazetka/Gazetka dla Dzieci i Młodzieży (Our Little Paper/The Little Paper for Children and the Young People, 1940–1941).
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Abstract

Until 1914 editors of Gazeta Gdańska were taken to court on thirty occasions and were sentenced to a total of RM 2,430 in fines and eight months and three weeks of imprisonment. Of the fifteen editors taken to court, Józef Konstanty Palędzki i Stanisław Wentowski came out with most convictions.
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Abstract

This article examines the coverage of German themes in Polish local press by focusing on a number of newspapers and periodicals published at Siedlce in the 1930s, i.e. Gazeta Podlaska, Nowa Gazeta Podlaska, Głos Podlaski, Ziemia Siedlecka, Wiadomości Diecezjalne Podlaskie and Życie Podlasia.
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Abstract

This is an analysis of the commentaries published in the Polish press in the wake of the celebrations of the 60th Anniversary of the World War II Victory Day in Moscow in 2005. In Poland these commemorations triggered a live debate which focused on the future of Polish-Russian relations, Russia’s strategic goals on the international scene, the Polish Eastern policy and the uses of history as a tool of state policy.
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Abstract

Polish popular-science periodicals have not yet been researched in terms of their overall graphic design and layout. Undertaking an in-depth assessment of this particular aspect was intended to follow the development of graphic design in the periodicals published on the Polish lands throughout the period spanning 1758–1939, with a view to identifying the most characteristic components that stood for overall visual appeal of specific publications, whilst pondering overall aesthetic and educational value of diverse illustrative material they offered to their readership. The article presents an outline of research into the graphic design of fifty such periodicals, highly representative of a popular-science genre. Comprehensive research results along with the accompanying factual material and tabularised data, which might well prove of some consequence in further comparative research, are available in a book format.
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Abstract

This article examines the jubilee book Nasz Plon [Our Harvest] prepared by editors of the Warsaw weekly magazine [Children’s Friend] (1861–1915) to mark the golden anniversary of its first issue. Set to appear in April 1911, its publication, plagued by various delays, did not take place until the following year. The volume, edited in a rather unprofessional manner (probably by Jadwiga Chrząszczewska), was full of errors ranging from misprints to all kinds of factual blunders. Yet, despite its faults it has a special place in the history of the Polish press: it was the first jubilee book of a children’s magazine and thus a notable sign of the rising social status of the children’s magazines.
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Abstract

This is a survey of Polish-language Jewish newspapers and periodicals published in Galicia prior to 1918 taking into account the general background of multilingual Jewish press in this autonomous province of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It appears that the total amount of Jewish periodical publications in that period was 182, including 31 in Polish. This survey also attempts to establish the publication frequency and longevity of each periodical and identify the communities or sponsors that supported them.
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Abstract

In 1939–1989 it was common for an aspiring writer to make an entry into the literary scene through a literary magazine. This article revisits the problem by distinguishing two categories of literary magazines, those produced for the young from those by the young. The latter were launched through the initiative of young writers seeking a platform of their own, i.e. the impulse for the creation of such periodicals came from the literary community itself. The article also draws on Professor Kazimierz Wyka’s periodization of literature on the basis of a pair of criteria, the historical and the generational (literary groups and generations). They are an important analytical tool in the mapping of generational change in the literary history of Poland in 1945–1989.
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Abstract

This article presents the last decade of the Krystyna Cywińska’s journalism, published in the London Nowy Czas [ The New Time] in 2007– 2017. Her journalistic career began in London in 1947: she was a regular contributor to Radio Free Europe, the BBC, the London Dziennik Polski i Dziennik Żołnierza [ The Polish Daily and Soldier’s Daily] and its Sunday supplement Tydzień Polski [ The Polish Weekly]. In the course of fifty years she developed a distinctly personal style of commenting on the social and political realities of the day, especially those affected the lives of the Polish expatriates.
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Abstract

Confronted with a natural tendency of marginalization national/ethnic minorities and immigrant communities respond by adopting two diverse strategies of showing their presence in the public sphere of the host country. Depending on the level of their integration and the goals they want to achieve, they can either stress their links (affinity) with the majority culture or the differences that mark them out. However, some minority communities succeed in achieving a distinctive presence in the public sphere already at the stage of launching its own media.
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